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The High Sierra Library

Grab your bear can or camp chair, kick your feet up and chew the fat about anything Sierra Nevada related that doesn't quite fit in any of the other forums. Within reason, (and the HST rules and guidelines) this is also an anything goes forum. Tell stories, discuss wilderness issues, music, or whatever else the High Sierra stirs up in your mind.
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby markskor » Sat Aug 03, 2013 6:36 pm

Mine in the Sky -
Joseph M. Kurtak, Margaret Swensen, Evan Swensen
Going back over a period of 100 years, Mine in the Sky tells of the events leading up to the discovery and development of the great tungsten ore bodies at Pine Creek, California.
Mountainman who swims with trout



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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby artrock23 » Mon Aug 05, 2013 10:30 pm

The High Sierra: Peaks-Passes-Trails by R.J. Secor (Third Edition)

Guide to the John Muir Trail and the High Sierra Region by Walter A Starr, Jr.
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby will_jrob » Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:03 pm

Yosemite and its High Sierra, John H. Williams, San Francisco, 1921. A perspective of conservationists of early 20th Century, plus interesting photos of Sierra Club outing to MtLyell.
Gentle Wilderness, Richard Kaufman, John Muir;Sierra Cub, 1968. Photos and Muir essays of Sierra Nevada.
Mammoth Lakes Sierra, Genny Smith, 1976 (4th ed.). Hikes and info of east-side Sierras.
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby markskor » Wed Jan 01, 2014 5:10 pm

Just a few (from my library)...books not yet listed -

Trails and Tales of the Yosemite & Central Sierra; Giacomazzi, S; Bored Feet Press, 2001
Yosemite Valley Secret Places and Magic Moments; Arnot, P; Wide World Publishing, 1992
Thomas Hill: The Grand View; Oakland Museum Art Department, 1980
Mountaineering Essays; Muir, J; Peregrine Smith Books, 1984
The Yosemite: Muir, J; Sierra Club Books, 1988
The Mountains of California; Muir, J; Ten Speed Press, 1977
The Pacific Crest Trail, vol 1, California; Wilderness Press, 1995
Tioga Tramps - Day Hikes in the Tioga Pass Region; O'Neill & O'Neill; Albicaulis Press, 2002
A Treasury of the Sierra Nevada: Reid, R.L.; Wilderness Press Berkeley,1992
The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher; Fletcher, C; Knopf, 1989
The Complete Walker, Fletcher, C; Knopf, 1972
Mammoth Gold; Caldwell, G; Genny Smith Books, 1990
The California Trail; Stewart, G; University of Nebraska Press, 1962
A Sierra Club Naturalist's Guide; Whitney, S; Sierra Club Books, 1979
Yosemite Trout Fishing Guide; Beck, S; Frank Amato Publications, 1995
Yosemite Trout Fishing; Johnston, H; Flying Spur Press, 1985
Trout and Salmon of North America; Tomelleri, J; The Free Press, 2002
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby rlown » Wed Jan 01, 2014 6:03 pm

nice list.. also no books in the last 10 years. Wish Cutter would update his with the help of the DFW.
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby oldranger » Wed Jan 01, 2014 6:04 pm

Four books by Stewart Edward White,

The Rules of the Game. Fiction but interesting story about the lumber industry and forest service in California. Interesting mention of Jack Main Canyon.

The Mountains. Story about horse packing in the Sierra. Great description of dropping down to Simpson Meadow via the "Tunemah Trail."

The Pass. Story about trying to get a pack train from Roaring River to Kaweah River, first by cloud canyon then up Deadman.

The Cabin. Story about building a cabin somewhere between Northfork and mammoth pool.

Each of these were written within several years of 1900.

Mike
Mike

Who can't do everything he used to and what he can do takes a hell of a lot longer!
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby Fly Guy Dave » Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:57 pm

rlown wrote:nice list.. also no books in the last 10 years. Wish Cutter would update his with the help of the DFW.



In case you missed it... viewtopic.php?f=6&t=9377&p=70019&hilit=cutter#p70019

I wish he would update the Trout Guide as well, but when the $$ isn't there to do so, why bother?
"Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man." --Jeff Lebowski

Some pics of native salmonids: http://flyguydave.wordpress.com/
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby balance » Fri Jun 13, 2014 10:49 pm

I like libraries. My suggestions:

"Mountaineering: The Freedom of the HIlls", for the more adventuous.

"Exploring the Southern Sierra: West Side" and "Exploring the Southern Sierra: East Side", for, you might say, the less adventurous.

"Guide to the Theodore Solomons Trail", for the medium adventurous.

Peace.
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby larry1 » Tue Jun 24, 2014 4:15 pm

1) Exploring Eastern Sierra Canyons, Sonora Pass to Pine Creek

2) Exploring Eastern Sierra Canyons, Bishop to Lone Pine

both books by Sharon Giacomazzi, July 2009, published by www.boredfeet.com

3) Angling Alpine, A Field Guide for Fly Fishing Alpine County, by J.E.Warren-Wickwire

contact Sorensen's Resort, Hope Valley, 800.423.9949
if fly fishing the Carson River and surrounding area, this is the guide
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby giantbrookie » Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:28 pm

For folks that are really into High Sierra fishing, there are three out-of-print books that are worth seeking out:
First are the two classics by Charles McDermand:
Yosemite and Kings Canyon Trout
and
The Waters of Golden Trout Country

Another, less well-known narrative style book on the subject (that includes some stories from the Klamath Mtns wilderness areas and Lassen as well as the High Sierra) is Mike Hayden's
Fishing the California Wilderness.

Whereas fisheries management strategies have changed dramatically through the years, many of the waters described in these books are not much different than they were in these old, whereas others are dramatically different. One also gains an understanding of current issues in High Sierra fisheries from reading McDermand, too. For example there are a number of accounts of obese trout gorging themselves on polliwogs. Guess what kind of frogs those were.

What hasn't changed, though, is the mindset of the high country angler, be it refracted through the accounts of McDermand in the late 1940's or Hayden in the '70's or the accounts we see posted online today. Folks unfamiliar with these books will find them a very enjoyable read.
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby giantbrookie » Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:45 pm

rlown wrote:nice list.. also no books in the last 10 years. Wish Cutter would update his with the help of the DFW.

Actually the key are the studies done for Seki and Yosemite, more than the DFW-associated works outside of the NPs, although both sources are needed for the full update. I would suspect that Cutter had the (then) CDFG data on which to base his trout distribution tables outside the NPs, so it was pretty accurate in those regions (I estimated that the list included 95 percent of the lakes with trout in non-NP areas). The NPs were another matter because the detailed records were very dfficult to find there. In Yosemite I estimate that the Cutter 2nd Ed list was probably short by about 10-15 percent, although he got one key lake that was missed by both Johnston and Beck (the one I fished last week). It was Seki that was the black hole for everyone. I do not exaggerate when I say the list in the 2nd Edition probably had less than 50 percent of the trout-bearing lakes in Seki. A cursory inspection of Sierra South would add dozens alone. I personally fished 74 lakes with fish not listed in the 2nd Edition that have fish and nearly all of these are in Seki (and those 74 exclude lakes that meet his "exclusion criteria" of rare or unique fisheries). There are an additional 7 lakes with the question mark symbol that I verified as as having fish, too. That might be viewed as the tip of the iceberg because I figure I've probably fished less than 20 percent of the trout-bearing lakes in Seki. Now I know certain folks associated with the frog habitat and restoration studies who have information on every last lake in Seki and Yosemite, so all the pertinent information can be had if an update project is to be undertaken.

However, perhaps now is not the time for the "Big Update". There have been a number of changes in management policy whose results will be played out in the coming years---whether some marginal spawning lakes maintain populations after air drop cutoff, for example. On the other hand, an update might be undertaken now, then a website set up for further incremental updates similar to what Climber.org did with Corrections to Secor (which was in fact done with R.J.'s blessing).
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
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Re: The High Sierra Library

Postby rlown » Sun Jul 20, 2014 4:57 pm

giantbrookie wrote:However, perhaps now is not the time for the "Big Update". There have been a number of changes in management policy whose results will be played out in the coming years---whether some marginal spawning lakes maintain populations after air drop cutoff, for example. On the other hand, an update might be undertaken now, then a website set up for further incremental updates similar to what Climber.org did with Corrections to Secor.


Now is the time to have an accurate log of what is happening with all Sierra lakes. The CDFW online guide is a great start, but it takes resources. Your thread is what we have and BA to keep us kind of up to date.

NPS needs to step it up as well!!!!!

Probably not the right thread to post this on, but as you brought it up! :)
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