How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness? | High Sierra Topix  

How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

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Re: How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

Postby LMBSGV » Fri Sep 24, 2010 8:54 pm

Walter "Pete" Starr died in 1933. Norman Clyde found his body after all the other searchers gave up. He and Jules Eichorn then went back later and entombed the body with rocks on the ledge where it lay with Walter Starr Sr. watching from below. See the introduction to Ansel Adam's Sierra Nevada: the John Muir Trail for the full story. Clyde's ashes were scattered on Norman Clyde Peak (I believe illegally with knowing rangers not interfering). Adams ashes were scattered by his children an Mt. Ansel Adams.



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Re: How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

Postby sierramel » Sat Sep 25, 2010 10:32 am

Yep...
That's the one. I checked it out today and found the article posted above. Peter (Walter Starr Jr.) is probably the highest known burial in the lower 48, and in 1933, not in the 60's.
Norman Clyde could find almost anything or anyone back there.
"Some places remain unknown because no one has ventured forth. Others remain so because no one has ever come back."
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Re: How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

Postby giantbrookie » Sat Oct 02, 2010 8:59 pm

LMBSGV wrote:Walter "Pete" Starr died in 1933. Norman Clyde found his body after all the other searchers gave up. He and Jules Eichorn then went back later and entombed the body with rocks on the ledge where it lay with Walter Starr Sr. watching from below. See the introduction to Ansel Adam's Sierra Nevada: the John Muir Trail for the full story. Clyde's ashes were scattered on Norman Clyde Peak (I believe illegally with knowing rangers not interfering). Adams ashes were scattered by his children an Mt. Ansel Adams.

There is a great book on in the subject of Walter Starr, Jr.'s death and the search for his remains, eventual burial, and even a "postscript" of two climbers finding the grave many years later: "Missing in the Minarets". Highly recommended.

I agree with MK that I don't think I want to see a proliferation of lasting memorials in the backcountry. Whereas the older ones tend to be associated with climbing/exploring/settling lore, such as the "Here lies Anna and Conrad Redenbacher" or something like that below Banner, and the unmarked graves by Ritter Lakes, there are just more people going into the wilderness now and I think if the physical memorial trend were to go unchecked, some popular stretches of trails will start looking like some of our more notorious and dangerous roads (with lots of memorials along them). My brother and I scattered our dad's ashes scattered beneath North Peak above his beloved Saddlebag area, but no trace was left otherwise. I don't really want to think of where I'd request to have my scattered, for, like most of us, I hope that is a long ways off. Dumbbell Lakes would be too inconvenient for the ash bearer...
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
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Re: How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

Postby sierramel » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:41 pm

....Don't get me wrong, I'm not advocating a wholesale invasion of memorial plaques into the wilderness. That, of course, with the later-day heavy traffic in the backcountry, would be a travesty.
What I meant was memorials more along the lines like the one I've been searching for but never been able to find, down near the Kings up a tree somewhere. I know of it from reputation.
I did take a guy out one time who went up to conceal the ashes of his grandparents in a small cave near Lost Keys Lakes. I thought that was pretty neat.
"Some places remain unknown because no one has ventured forth. Others remain so because no one has ever come back."
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Re: How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

Postby Vaca Russ » Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:07 am

quentinc wrote:Rlown, I'm also fine with scattering ashes. I suspect other NPs have the same rule as Yosemite, but I have no problem if someone skips the permit part and just follows the guidelines (e.g., not near a water source).

As for me personally? I would say the top of Mt. Russell, but I wouldn't want to endanger anyone's life in the process of memorializing the end of mine!


That is pretty eerie.

To keep on topic...several month ago I ran into this at an off trail lake in Deso.

Joe Boocks.JPG


About two years ago, while at Royce, we ran into three guys who packed in the ashes of their friend. They were going to scatter his ashes in the Bear Lakes basin.

-Russ
” Auto racing, bull fighting, and mountain climbing are the only real sports … all others are games.”- Ernest Hemingway
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Re: How do you feel about personal memorials in the Wilderness?

Postby MountainMinstrel » Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:27 pm

It seems to me that memorials do not belong in the backcountry. Yet I realize that those who have lost loved ones need to do something (especially if the person is never found) to memorialize them. So why not put the memorials at trail heads? That would not just memorialize them but possibly could save another family from suffering the same fate, by being a reminder that the backcountry is a dangerous place.
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