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Senate passes HR3022 66-12

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Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby Strider » Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:09 pm

The bill designates over 2,000,000 acres in 9 states as wilderness, including Mineral King, Hockett Plateau and Redwood Canyon/Chimney Rock.
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby AldeFarte » Sun Jan 11, 2009 11:51 pm

I don't get it. Is Hockett plateau the same as Hockett meadows? That is already in the park. Any further lock up of property is a travesty and a crime. jimme carter is the biggest ahsobcsingmf :angry: bfer this state has had the misfortune to have had the country screw itself by electing this low life ,unspeakable body excretion to office. I can only hope osama will be a better man. Time will tell the tale. Incrementle extortion is a crime against true patriots. Locking up land is worse than extortion. Please let "freedom" ring. jls
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby Strider » Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:04 am

Whoa, dude! Chill out!

The designation takes the acreage from National Forest or National Park to designated Wilderness Area (so no bridges, etc.)

Anything after BU$HCO's rapaciousness will be an improvement.
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby tomcat_rc » Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:19 am

Strider wrote:The designation takes the acreage from National Forest or National Park to designated Wilderness Area (so no bridges, etc.)

Anything after BU$HCO's rapaciousness will be an improvement.


The issue is still roads and access.
More wilderness closures in California Deserts - and legislaters seem unwilling to listen to the public. When will it end.
Last edited by tomcat_rc on Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby BSquared » Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:02 am


Federal wilderness protection for California land moves forward

The Senate clears the way for passage of legislation that would expand wilderness protection to more than 2 million acres of public land nationwide, mostly in California and the West.
By Richard Simon
January 12, 2009
Reporting from Washington -- Large swaths of California wild lands would gain federal wilderness protection under legislation that took a step toward approval in the U.S. Senate during a rare Sunday session.

The measure, which would expand the protection to more than 2 million acres of public land nationwide, may be the most significant conservation legislation in a decade, said Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee and the bill's manager.

It would designate as wilderness -- the government's highest protection -- about 190,000 acres in Riverside County, including parts of Joshua Tree National Park; about 450,000 acres in the Eastern Sierra and San Gabriel Mountains north of Los Angeles; and about 90,000 acres in Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, including John Krebs Wilderness.

The measure also would authorize $88 million in funding to launch an ambitious effort to restore the San Joaquin River, which has been drained for decades to supply Central Valley farms. More water would be left in the river, and populations of spring-run chinook salmon would be returned under terms of a legal settlement in a long-running environmental battle over the river.

The proposal is expected to win final Senate approval by the end of the week and then go to the House, where it is also expected to be approved.

"We're very excited that these slices of wild California are so close to being permanently protected," said Ryan Henson, policy director of the California Wilderness Coalition.

As part of its wilderness protections, the measure would authorize a study on whether the Tule Lake Segregation Center, a World War II internment camp for Japanese Americans, should be included in the national park system.

"This is a great moment -- for me personally and for California -- to see three important parts of it move closer to becoming law," said Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.).

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) called the Sunday session -- and the Senate's first roll call of the year -- out of anger over what he regarded as stalling tactics by Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), a critic of the bill.

Democrats increased their majority in the November election and were prepared to flex their muscle to prevent a filibuster. But it wasn't necessary. Because the bill includes projects eagerly sought by senators from both parties for their states, it easily cleared the procedural hurdle with a 66-12 vote.

Besides California, wilderness designations would be made in Oregon, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Michigan, West Virginia and Virginia. The package of about 160 bills also would designate former President Clinton's childhood home in Hope, Ark., as a national historic site.

The measure also includes initiatives intended to reduce wildfire risk and increase water supplies.

The legislation drew opposition from conservatives and property rights groups, which assailed it as a land grab that would close areas to energy production. Critics also questioned whether Congress, facing massive budget deficits and a backlog of park maintenance, should be taking up legislation now that would authorize, among other things, a commission to plan a 450th anniversary celebration in 2015 for the founding of St. Augustine, Fla.

"We can't continue to pass bills by putting together a little bit of what everybody wants and forgetting what's good for our country," said Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.).

Mike Matz, executive director of the Campaign for America's Wilderness, said the legislation would be a "most welcome action by many Americans who face so much uncertainty in their lives. It will be nice for them to know they can visit their most treasured spots and see them just as they are. They will be able to continue to hike, hunt, fish, camp or canoe amid this natural splendor, and that is no small consolation in these difficult times."

richard.simon@latimes.com
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby hikerduane » Mon Jan 12, 2009 7:57 pm

What I have questioned years ago, if all this land over the years was so special and needed protection, why did it take so long? I am for many places being wilderness, but I question why a little here and a little there, slipping it under the rug so it only seems a little?
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby trav867 » Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:25 pm

Am I the only one who thinks Wilderness designation is a great thing? According to wikipedia, 2.6% of the land in the lower 48 is designated wilderness. The US has some of the most amazing geography in the world and it seems a shame that such a small amount has received wilderness protection.
As to Duane's point, the Wilderness Act was passed in 1964, and it takes an act of congress, or executive order to create new wilderness. I think that explains why it's taken so long to get to our current level of federal protection. Its an unfortunate reality of our political system that pet projects are snuck into every piece legitimate legislation to secure needed votes.

Anyway, I'm not looking for a fight, just wanted to say I support this recent bill.
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby JMat » Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:38 pm

trav867 wrote:Am I the only one who thinks Wilderness designation is a great thing?

I'm with you on this. Where is the harm in the "Wilderness" Designation? I can only see good things coming from this.

JMat
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby AldeFarte » Tue Jan 13, 2009 1:15 am

Trav, You can count me out on this. When the powers that you seem to trust wholeheartily lock up land, they are inevitably taking something from someone you do not know. It happened hundreds of times to hundreds of people in Ak. when the unspeakable excretment known as jimme locked up millions of acres here. This is tyranny by faceless bureaucrats. We all love wild open spaces, but we don't need punitive laws such as this proposal will become when this comes to pass. When you walk in the woods ,do you see the forest ,or do you see the trees?...... Think about it. jls
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby BSquared » Tue Jan 13, 2009 5:52 am

trav867 wrote:Am I the only one who thinks Wilderness designation is a great thing?


Nope, you're definitely not alone.

-B2
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby tomcat_rc » Tue Jan 13, 2009 7:25 am

If it was just protecting land from development, I think you would see a lot more people in favor of some form of protection. But when you block off lands and deny access including closing down pre-existing roads, you will meet a lot more resistance. This bill was essentially dead last year after public outcry.

Suppose you had to start hiking Mt. Whitney from Lone Pine or some of your other trail heads were backed off and campgrounds closed off. You may feel quite different. There are some fantastic areas in the Eastern Sierra that are being closed off.
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Re: Senate passes HR3022 66-12

Postby hikerduane » Tue Jan 13, 2009 7:28 pm

trav867, I agree, the pet projects or stuff that normally would not pass muster so to speak gets passed as part of the bill.

The redneck in me also sees some of this as, "you've fouled your nest" and you want to tell me how to manage where I live? Don't take this too wrong, just what I see, my 2 cents. The Bay Area keeps pushing out into the ocean, correct?
Piece of cake.
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