Know about the Fujita Scale for tornadoes? Now we have one for atmospheric rivers - read

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rightstar76
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Know about the Fujita Scale for tornadoes? Now we have one for atmospheric rivers - read

Post by rightstar76 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:31 am

We live in interesting scary times. :eek:
Now they have a new rating system to help them—and the public—understand what an incoming atmospheric river might unleash; on Tuesday researchers unveiled the “atmospheric river scale.”
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... n-the-sky/








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Re: Know about the Fujita Scale for tornadoes? Now we have one for atmospheric rivers - read

Post by rightstar76 » Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:01 am

Remember the Lions Fire last year?
The Fire Is Burning In An Area With 50% Mortality (bug Kill)at Approximately 6000-8000' In Red Fir, Brush And Heavy Blowdown
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5850/

Will the upcoming atmospheric river this week melt the snow in that elevation belt? 🤔

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Re: Know about the Fujita Scale for tornadoes? Now we have one for atmospheric rivers - read

Post by rightstar76 » Wed Feb 20, 2019 11:14 pm

Just took a look at the 8-14 day prediction. Concerning for Sierra Nevada south of SEKI as well as SoCal mountains. Currently, the snow is piling high even at lower elevations. Problem is the first week of March shows above average precipitation and above average temps. Wonder if another atmoshperic river is coming to SoCal? If so, how much snow will be left at lower elevations? Will lower elevations of Kern Plateau and Greenhorn Mountains still have snow? Hmm.

https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/ ... ns/814day/

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Re: Know about the Fujita Scale for tornadoes? Now we have one for atmospheric rivers - read

Post by rightstar76 » Sat Feb 23, 2019 10:13 am

Looks like an atmospheric river will affect Oregon and NorCal this week so most of southern Sierra Nevada and SoCal spared. But another one forecast for next weekend, March 2-3. Will be interesting to see how that one turns out.

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Re: Know about the Fujita Scale for tornadoes? Now we have one for atmospheric rivers - read

Post by gdurkee » Sat Mar 23, 2019 8:04 pm

Dan Swain (darned good climatologist, author of the blog Weather West) on Ark Storms and Atmospheric Rivers:
http://weatherwest.com/archives/6252
His paper is here, but just abstract:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0140-y behind a paywall which, just as a side note is totally &*@^&%&!^%@ed for what's really publicly funded research. However, I recommend SciHub, which I've found useful to get papers otherwise paywalled.

Anyway, Swain et al speculate that the return interval of the 1862 type California flood may, instead of the previous 1,000 year interval, may actually be 100 or 200 years. The Central Valley would be utterly wiped out were that to recur.

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