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Climate Change in California Article

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Re: Climate Change in California Article

Postby longri » Mon May 14, 2018 4:06 pm

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Last edited by longri on Tue May 15, 2018 3:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Re: Climate Change in California Article

Postby rightstar76 » Tue May 15, 2018 7:51 am

I am concerned. Slowly, the beautiful Sierra Nevada forests are going to disappear. There will be more asthma and higher health costs. Also, burned forests mean burned soils which become mud flows. It's going to affect everyone.

Westerling said there are likely to be more forest fires, as opposed to chaparral fires, in California in future years. That means more wildlife habitat will be destroyed by fire, humans will be breathing more particulate matter, more homes will be in danger, and the cost of homeowners insurance will continue to rise.

“Under any of the scenarios we’ve looked at, we see increased wildfires in the Sierra Nevada, Southern Cascade and North Coast range forests because their elevation makes them more sensitive to temperature increases.” he said. “It means we are going to have big increases in air pollution emissions from these burning forest fires.”

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Climate-change-ruining-California-s-12899272.php
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Re: Climate Change in California Article

Postby dave54 » Tue May 15, 2018 10:04 am

Not mentioned with increasing fires is the corresponding poor regeneration rate as after the fire. The burned forests are not recovering back into conifer, but brush.
Active recovery will be needed if you ever want to see the area tree covered again in your lifetime.
Active recovery is salvaging and tree planting. Too many 'activists' oppose salvage logging, thus perpetuating the problem.
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Re: Climate Change in California Article

Postby longri » Tue May 15, 2018 11:41 am

deleted dumb comment
Last edited by longri on Tue May 15, 2018 3:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Climate Change in California Article

Postby rightstar76 » Tue May 15, 2018 2:15 pm

The real problem is USFS is severely underfunded. Congress doesn't think it's a priority to remove the trees. So the trees lie on the ground waiting to burn and then the soil is ruined. A very serious and urgent problem that can easily be solved. Lots of jobs could be created, not just the tree removal and planting, but in the recreational sector i.e. hunting, fishing, etc. Once an area is burned out so badly that nobody wants to visit, the local economy is hit hard as well.
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Re: Climate Change in California Article

Postby dave54 » Tue May 15, 2018 3:43 pm

Private landowners can complete a two page emergency salvage plan and start hauling logs while the fire crews are still mopping up. I have personally experienced this.
The USFS has to complete an environmental analysis to salvage log. A single appeal from some Luddite eco-group delays the salvaging until the logs decline in value.
A burned tree has a very short time it is economically feasible to log. Even a frivilous appeal in effect kills the project.
This is a loss to everyone, including the environmental groups and outdoor recreationist. The proceeds from the logging pay not only for reforestation, but also rebuilding trails, wildlife habitat, watershed and fisheries projects. 25% of the proceeds go to the local county earmarked for roads and schools. So killing a salvage logging is also impacting kids education and maintaining the roads you use to get to the trailhead.
Plus, salvaging reduces future fire risk. Not salvaging increases future fire risk.
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