Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

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Tom_H
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Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by Tom_H » Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:26 pm









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rightstar76
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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by rightstar76 » Fri Apr 20, 2018 2:35 am

Thank you for sharing this. I read the Wapo article, as well as one in the Missoulian. There was also an article about him in the latter publication from 2014. Great quotes in all the articles.

Well...there is the past, and now the future. Some things will always be the same, other things not so much. Changes abound. I can see some real exciting threads coming out of this with lots of discourse. This is an exciting time. :D

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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by Wandering Daisy » Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:14 am

Would love to read that article, but the Washington Post says I have to pay $1 for it!

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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by rightstar76 » Sat Apr 21, 2018 8:17 am

Try using Adblock Plus and/or clearing your browser cache. That might get you a couple free views. It's one of the methods I use when there's a paywall. ;)

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Tom_H
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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by Tom_H » Sat Apr 21, 2018 10:08 am

Wandering Daisy wrote:Would love to read that article, but the Washington Post says I have to pay $1 for it!
First, make sure you have no active pages from WaPo running. Next, go into your browser preferences, then to the cookies cache. Find the cookie for Washington Post and delete it. Finally click on the link I gave. You will be able to read 3 articles before they again ask for the $1/month subscription fee. Repeat as necessary.

Notes: 1. If you have one WaPo page active in the browser when you attempt this, the active page will call for a cookie to be redeposited instantly, thus make sure no WaPo pages are running. 2. Depending on your computer and its software, cookies might load instantly, or they may take a minute or so to load. 3. This technique works when a site uses only cookies to track your use of their site. If they are tracking you by your Internet Protocol Address (your computer's unique ID number) then this will not work. WaPo uses cookies, so it will work.

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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by rlown » Sat Apr 21, 2018 10:27 am

or..
By Bart Barnes April 19 Email the author

Stewart M. Brandborg, a conservation activist and Wilderness Society leader who helped draft and advocate for passage of the landmark Wilderness Act of 1964 that set aside millions of acres of land for protection from human development, died April 14 at his home in Hamilton, Mont. He was 93.

The cause was congestive heart failure and lung disease, said a daughter, Betsy Brandborg.

Mr. Brandborg, known as “Brandy,” grew up in Montana and Idaho national forests where his father served as supervisor. As a child, he hunted, fished and hiked in the woods, streams and mountains around his home. He came to Washington in the 1950s to work for the National Wildlife Federation and was soon recruited to the Wilderness Society as assistant executive director to Howard Zahniser, who spent nearly eight years fighting for the Wilderness Act.

Mr. Brandborg, at 6-foot-2 and 200 pounds, cut an imposing figure in the halls of Congress, as he helped Zahniser lobby for passage of the bill against powerful timber, mining and grazing interests. He was described in historian James Morton Turner’s 2012 book “The Promise of Wilderness” as “a bear of a man . . . deep voiced, and devilishly charismatic. He could give a busy taxi cab driver reason to care about wilderness and he could hold the attention of a senator on a street corner.”

He assisted in dozens of drafts and revisions as it wound its way through the legislative process, working out compromises that set the path for a House victory with only one dissenting vote. Zahniser died just months before President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Wilderness Act, which created what Smithsonian magazine called the first time “land was set-aside for the specific purpose of protecting it from the reach of mankind.”

Mr. Brandborg had succeeded Zahniser and remained at the helm of the society for the next 12 years, seeking to bolster the act by obtaining wilderness recommendations from federal agencies.

“These coming years,” he wrote in 1966, “will test our power to the limit: our ability to communicate the need for preserving wilderness; our depth of conviction and willingness to follow through on our commitments as citizens; and above all our basic faith in the American people, who are moving so fast and crowding so closely, and needing wildness so much more today than ever before.”

During his tenure, more than 70 wilderness areas in 31 states were brought under the Wilderness Act’s protection. Since 1964, the National Wilderness Preservation System had expanded almost every year. It now includes 765 wilderness areas covering 109,982,783 acres in 44 states and Puerto Rico.

Stewart Monroe Brandborg was born Feb. 2, 1925, in Grangeville, Idaho, where his father was supervisor of the Nez Perce National Forest. He was 10 when his father was transferred to the Bitterroot National Forest in Montana, and they moved to Hamilton.

Mr. Brandborg graduated from the University of Montana in 1947. He did research on mountain goats for the state of Montana and later on elk and other big game species for the state of Idaho. In 1951 he received a master’s degree in wildlife biology from the University of Idaho.

His wife of 64 years, the former Anna Vee Mather, died in 2013. Survivors include five children, Becky Brandborg and Betsy Brandborg, both of Helena, Mont., Dan Brandborg and Fern Schreckendgust, both of Hamilton, and Lisa Orshoski of Elkwood, Va.; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

After being fired from the Wilderness Society in a dispute over money-raising techniques, Mr. Brandborg spent four years at the National Park Service as a special assistant to the director. Later he ran regional conferences and developed training materials for leaders in environmental movements. In 1986 he moved to Montana, where he grew up, to continue his work as an environmental proselytizer and defended the Wilderness Act against attempts to permit development in protected areas.

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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by rightstar76 » Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:05 am

Thanks Rlown. You always come up with the best practical solutions. :)

Here's another story:

http://missoulian.com/news/local/update ... d4ba1.html
By Rob Chaney April 16

Updated: Wilderness champion Brandborg dead at 93

Stewart Brandborg, who fueled the national campaign to pass the Wilderness Act of 1964, has died at his home outside Hamilton at age 93.

“Brandy was a passionate and tireless advocate for protecting America’s wilderness,” Wilderness Society President Jamie Williams said in an email on Sunday. “His ability to mentor advocates and galvanize citizen action was unmatched. He took up the leadership of The Wilderness Society right after the untimely death of Howard Zahniser, the author of the Wilderness Act, and Brandborg led the organization through a critical time for America’s conservation movement.

"His talents and passions, which never ebbed, have contributed greatly to conservation and preservation of America’s wilderness.”

Brandborg worked as a special assistant to Zahniser while the Wilderness Act was wending its way through Congress in the early 1960s. He traveled the nation encouraging local environmental and conservation groups to support the act, which was passed in 1964.

After that, he resumed the circuit to rally interest in new recommendations for future wilderness areas. He served as The Wilderness Society executive director during a period when Congress approved more than 70 federal wilderness areas in 31 states.

Born in 1925, Brandborg recalled meeting Bob Marshall and Gifford Pinchot before either man saw his name attached to a major wilderness area. Brandborg’s father, James, was Bitterroot National Forest supervisor during the U.S. Forest Service’s reassessment of its relationship with timber production.

Brandborg earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Montana in 1947 and a master’s in wildlife biology from the University of Idaho in 1951. His early professional work focused on mountain goats in the Flathead Alps at the head of the Sun River. UM commemorated his work in 2010 with an honorary doctorate.

In 1954, Brandborg moved to Washington, D.C., to work for the National Wildlife Federation. Zahniser brought him to The Wilderness Society as he was drafting the text that would become the Wilderness Act. Zahniser died four months before President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill.

Retired journalist and longtime friend Dale Burk recalled how Brandborg’s unwavering political will nevertheless could adapt to change. The final hurdle to the Wilderness Bill’s passage was the objection of Rep. Wayne Aspinall, R-Colorado, who fought the draft bill’s plan to let federal agencies designate wilderness areas. The final bill gave that authority to Congress.

“Looking back, it ended up being a serendipity thing although I don’t think they saw it that way at the time,” Burk said of the compromise. “Shortly afterward, the act was interpreted in a way that a citizen group could literally ask a congressman to carry a wilderness bill (instead of waiting for an agency to recommend it).

"And the first such bill passed by Congress was the Lincoln-Scapegoat bill (which added the Scapegoat Wilderness to the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex in 1972). Stewart was one of the people in leadership who took that opportunity and immediately put it to work.”

That work involved thousands of hours and miles visiting small groups and getting them to send letters to congressional delegations. Burk said few people know Brandborg used the same tactic to help civil rights organizations fight racism and discrimination before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Daughter Betsy Brandborg recalled that growing up with someone so dedicated to grassroots organizing had unusual benefits. On one five-day summer road trip from Washington, D.C., to Montana, the family realized they’d forgotten their dog, Sukey, during a pit stop by a giant buffalo statue in South Dakota.

Their dad had a meeting to get to and lacked time to drive back several hours. However, he’d spent so much time barnstorming the area, he found a small airport and hired a pilot to fly him back to Jamestown and recover the dog.

“We called the police and they said Sukey was guarding a garbage can by the big buffalo,” Betsy said. “He hopped in the plane, met the police at the airport, they took him to the buffalo, he picked up Sukey, and flew back. There was a certain amount of chaos in our family, really fun chaos.”

In 1977, Brandborg moved to the National Park Service, where he worked on the legislation that protected more than 100 million acres of public land in Alaska in 1980. Six years later, he moved back to the Bitterroot Valley, where he helped found activist organizations Friends of the Bitterroot and Bitterrooters for Planning.

“He understood how to wield political power very well and he did it for decades,” said Carlotta Grandstaff, Brandborg’s neighbor and former Ravalli County commissioner. “His greatest talent was in motivating people to do what they thought they could not do. I feel like I’m not really grieving for him right now because he would not want me to waste my time. He would want me to do something. He was always asking ‘What are you going to do to make things better?’”

There were some things Brandborg would not do. He stood apart from many wilderness advocates, including The Wilderness Society, in his refusal to support collaborative projects combining timber harvest and wildland designation.

He opposed Democrat Sen. Jon Tester’s two recent attempts to add wilderness in western Montana and the bills of Republicans Sen. Steve Daines and Rep. Greg Gianforte to remove thousands of acres of federal Wilderness Study Areas from wilderness-quality management.

Even in declining health, Brandborg spoke like a man with one more chance to persuade someone. Burk compared it to cramming everything he wanted to say into a single paragraph, often without punctuation.

“Lots of people never set foot in a wilderness sanctuary, but they like the idea, the concept that somewhere Nature is working her will in the absence of the heavy hand of man,” Brandborg told the Missoulian on the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act in 2014. “Whether it’s a trip to the zoo, or a heavily used city park, there’s something in the American people, inherited from their grandfathers and grandmothers who were the frontier vanguard that developed this country, for the outdoors. Even if they’ve never had a camping trip, never sampled Nature, they are an alliance of people who speak for unspoiled landscapes, rivers, mountains and deserts.”

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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by Tom_H » Sat Apr 21, 2018 7:17 pm

Well, yea, that's easy. It's also illegal and in violation of HST rules, isn't it?

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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by rlown » Sat Apr 21, 2018 7:59 pm

Tom_H wrote:Well, yea, that's easy. It's also illegal and in violation of HST rules, isn't it?
What is illegal, Tom?

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Tom_H
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Re: Longtime Leader of Wilderness Society Passes Away

Post by Tom_H » Sat Apr 21, 2018 10:52 pm

rlown wrote:
Tom_H wrote:Well, yea, that's easy. It's also illegal and in violation of HST rules, isn't it?
What is illegal, Tom?
Copying the entirety of a newspaper or magazine article into another media publication. I thought that was copyright violation as well as forum rules violation. No??? :dontknow

If that's permissible, then cool. I just thought it wasn't allowed.

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