HST Community      hiking classifications

hiking classifications | High Sierra Topix  

hiking classifications

Grab your bear can or camp chair, kick your feet up and chew the fat about anything Sierra Nevada related that doesn't quite fit in any of the other forums. Within reason, (and the HST rules and guidelines) this is also an anything goes forum. Tell stories, discuss wilderness issues, music, or whatever else the High Sierra stirs up in your mind.

Re: hiking classifications

Postby Wandering Daisy » Mon Oct 26, 2015 11:13 am

I am not up on my popular culture, but I thought we baby boomers are well past (too old) to be a "yuppie". I do not think that classification is limited to any age group- could label it as the "want-a-guide-for-free" backpacker.

Or perhaps the "insecure bucket-list" backpacker. Not really interested in the process, just wants bragging rights, not sure of his/her skills enough to do it him/herself. This backpacker will ONLY do "big name" trails or routes well documented and bragged about on the internet- nothing obscure. Definitely this trip will entail a lot of "selfies".



User avatar
Wandering Daisy
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 3297
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 7:19 pm
Location: Fair Oaks CA (Sacramento area)
Experience: N/A

Re: hiking classifications

Postby Cross Country » Mon Oct 26, 2015 11:42 am

WD - I liked yours - pretty funny.
Cross Country
Topix Fanatic
 
Posts: 1220
Joined: Thu Dec 24, 2009 10:16 am
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: hiking classifications

Postby Shhsgirl » Mon Oct 26, 2015 1:24 pm

WD, you may be correct. It may be that Baby Boomers are too old to be Yuppies. I'm too old to recall when "yuppie" came into the currency!
User avatar
Shhsgirl
Topix Acquainted
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 10:44 am
Experience: N/A

Re: hiking classifications

Postby Cloudy » Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:31 pm

Sorry, I couldn't tell that it started in jest. :) I'm still not into classifying folks but if I had to, it would be "dumb@$$es" and the rest...
User avatar
Cloudy
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 10:08 am
Location: Central California
Experience: N/A

Re: hiking classifications

Postby LMBSGV » Mon Oct 26, 2015 7:00 pm

Here's the Wikipedia entry on "yuppie."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuppie

As a baby boomer (born 1951), "yuppies" were definitely the next generation. I know "baby boomers" are "officially" defined as 1946-1964, but if you weren't old enough to experience the Kennedy assassination, the Beatles on Ed Sullivan, and be draft-eligible for Vietnam (yes, I know women were not draft eligible back then, but they were old enough if we'd been less sexist) you are not a baby boomer.
User avatar
LMBSGV
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 637
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2007 7:42 pm
Location: San Geronimo, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: hiking classifications

Postby iHartMK » Tue Oct 27, 2015 8:50 am

Well since you're stereotyping people, SMH. Don't forget about the awful southern California hikers... the worst kind!.. They drive 7+ hours to the trailhead in their Lezbaru Outback wagons. They are the loudest most pretentious people on the trail. They are the ones us locals read about in the local news that got lost and died for doing something stupid in the backcountry. You're not in Disneyland anymore Mr & Mrs. SoCal.

I love that it only takes me 30 minutes to get to Sequoia Nat'l Park and that I can see most of the highest peaks from the second story of my home.
Living On Kaweah Time
User avatar
iHartMK
Topix Acquainted
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 10:43 am
Location: Visalia,California
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: hiking classifications

Postby TahoeJeff » Tue Oct 27, 2015 9:31 am

My motto:
Never trust anyone under 6200'.
Many of us have been so brainwashed over the years — by sheer repetition, rather than by either logic or empirical tests — that statistical disparities are automatically taken to mean discrimination, whether between races, sexes or whatever.
Thomas Sowell Nov. 24, 2016
User avatar
TahoeJeff
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 720
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2007 10:03 am
Location: South Lake Tahoe
Experience: N/A

Re: hiking classifications

Postby markskor » Tue Oct 27, 2015 9:37 am

TahoeJeff wrote:My motto:
Never trust anyone under 6200'.

Flatlander...lol. Try 7,800'.
Mountainman who swims with trout
User avatar
markskor
Founding Member & Forums Administrator
Founding Member & Forums Administrator
 
Posts: 2152
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 4:41 pm
Location: Mammoth Lakes
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: hiking classifications

Postby Cloudy » Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:04 pm

"They drive 7+ hours to the trailhead in their Lezbaru Outback wagons". That is another atypical stereotype in the making (except for the hours)! I have owned my 1985 Subaru 4WD GL wagon since 1985 and it's getting time for a replacement after serving me well for so many years. It was love at first sight and and I have never regretted my choice. I will likely replace it next year with with a six-cylinder Outback since sadly, they phased out 4WD and manual transmissions. It may be the last car I ever own - which is a frightening thought... :)
User avatar
Cloudy
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 10:08 am
Location: Central California
Experience: N/A

Re: hiking classifications

Postby AlmostThere » Tue Oct 27, 2015 7:31 pm

Cloudy wrote:"They drive 7+ hours to the trailhead in their Lezbaru Outback wagons". That is another atypical stereotype in the making (except for the hours)! I have owned my 1985 Subaru 4WD GL wagon since 1985 and it's getting time for a replacement after serving me well for so many years. It was love at first sight and and I have never regretted my choice. I will likely replace it next year with with a six-cylinder Outback since sadly, they phased out 4WD and manual transmissions. It may be the last car I ever own - which is a frightening thought... :)


My significant alien drives a Subaru Forester - just replaced his old one with a new one - because they are the only car he fits in so as not to develop sore knees using the pedals and not hit his head on the ceiling. That it helps us get up to trailheads on iffy roads helps.

I've driven for about 10 hours to get to trailheads... sometimes it's worth the drive. Most weekends we drive less than 2 hours....
User avatar
AlmostThere
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 2244
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:38 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

PreviousNext

Return to The Campfire



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest