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The Pallet Mt C-119 Flying Boxcar Crashsite Photos

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The Pallet Mt C-119 Flying Boxcar Crashsite Photos

Postby Mtflyer » Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:41 pm

I've known about this crash site for a few years now and even tried to find it two weeks ago. :angry: All the reports I've read say that the C-119 was on north slope of Pallet Mountain when it's actually over a mile to the east on Pleasant View Ridge. The weather made it one of those magic days with heavy low clouds to the south that made for an awesome effect. :nod: This Fairchild C-119C crashed on 9/30/66 in bad weather, killing it's four man crew. Photos at
http://community.webshots.com/album/525306527dzwwSq



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Postby hikerduane » Mon Dec 19, 2005 10:04 pm

Thank you for the photos. Liked the one with the clouds gathering or low fog. How long did you spend looking around the crash site?
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Postby copeg » Mon Dec 19, 2005 10:16 pm

Thanks for sharing the photos. I've heard about that crash site but have never visited personally. That area up around the angeles crest hwy was my favorite place to venture back when I lived in Pasadena.
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Postby Mtflyer » Mon Dec 19, 2005 10:51 pm

I was at the site about three hours. The whole time I was rushing to see as much as I could. Didn't want to get caught in the dark and the cold temps that go with it on the way out. Plan to go back when the days get longer and try and find the stuff that should be there that I wasn't able to find. I been to six crash sites and this one was the easiest to get to and still has a lot of stuff there.

I always liked this part of the San Gabriels. It where I got back into hiking again about five years ago after not hiking for twenty years.
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Postby wingding » Wed Dec 21, 2005 7:09 am

Very nice pictures Mtflyer. How do you find out about the crash sites?
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Postby Mtflyer » Wed Dec 21, 2005 6:54 pm

I do a lot of searching online using Google. Going for things like "California aircraft crash sites" and any else I could think of. The problem is most reports don't give actuate loctions. The write ups on the C-119 Flying Boxcar say it's on the north slope of Pallet Mt which is over a mile away from the actual site. For the Badwater F-100 Super Sabre, I saw a photo of where a guy said he could see some of the wreckage from. I was able to find that spot and with binoculars I saw a piece and just started climbing to it. Half the fun is doing the research then actually finding something. Then there was the Towne Pass SA-16 Albatross that you told me about and Snow Nymph gave me the details about. That's the easy way. :nod:
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Postby Shawn » Wed Dec 21, 2005 7:02 pm

Hey MtFlyer, that's some neat stuff. I wonder if you have come across this websitehttp://users.fire2wire.com/djordan/ or the related book in your searches?

While I've never visited an aircraft wreck in the Sierra, I became intrigued when I learned of a downed military aircraft near Mt. Brewer that has yet to be found after many years. I can imagine the temptation to spend a lot of time and effort to be the first to locate it.
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Postby ERIC » Wed Dec 21, 2005 8:04 pm

Shawn,

That book isn't that good. I know, I have it. Take a look at the reviews it has over on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/092427 ... s&v=glance
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Postby Shawn » Wed Dec 21, 2005 8:11 pm

Wow, thanks - dunno why I never thought to look at the Amazon reviews before but you just saved me 25 bucks! "Interesting but useless" sums it up. Maybe some aircraft hunters are a little protective....
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Postby Mtflyer » Wed Dec 21, 2005 9:42 pm

I did buy that book a couple of years ago thinking that it would be a guide to the crash sites, but it turned out just being more of a listing of aircraft crashes.
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Postby ERIC » Wed Dec 21, 2005 9:53 pm

Shawn wrote:Maybe some aircraft hunters are a little protective....


I work in an aviation related occupation. But even if I didn't, this book is junk. The lack of editing and corrections in later editions is ridiculous. The release of multiple editions was an obvious attempt at selling more copies...nothing more...and with little work put into the venture to boot.

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