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Campground etiquette

Backpacking and camping basics and other general trip planning discussion for the uninitiated. Use this forum to learn where to look for the information you need, and to ask questions, related to the beginner basics of backpacking and camping, including technique and best practices.
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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby hikerchick395 » Mon Aug 15, 2011 1:31 pm

Etiquette in campgrounds and out on the trail (camps) has just been disregarded in so many instances that I've observed this year...no hope :retard: . If I have to see another person "use the restroom" right off the trail, #1 & #2, I'm gonna puke. I've seen most campsites 10 feet or closer to trails or water this year (so far. Only a few "legal.") What is happening people? (Ha, bear bagging about 4 feet off of the ground...now that made me giggle.)

OK...I could rant more...

Anyway the last time that I stayed in the Yosemite Valley BPr's camp, it wasn't too bad, depite the boy scout troop and the bear visits. Little Yosemite only had 8-10 sites occupied. Now Tuolumne was horrible...way overfull and noisy all night. Never again. So much so that at the Red's Meadow campground, we got a regular campsite instead of sharing the BPr's site. And I'll add "never again" to Trail Camp too.



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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby sparky » Tue Aug 30, 2011 3:19 pm

Sheesh judgeging people based on clothing or gear? You serious with that? Causing a commotion chopping wood is one thing, but looking down on a group on thier first trip out...jerks!

I was judged based on my street clothes by some old man at the whoa nellie deli as I attempted to start a conversation with him about his hike. It really irked me how ignorant people can be....I'd like to think experienced wilderness travelers are different, but nope. Assholes all the same. Just another reason I prefer solo hiking.
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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby markskor » Tue Aug 30, 2011 4:05 pm

sparky wrote:Sheesh judging people based on clothing or gear? You serious with that? Causing a commotion chopping wood is one thing, but looking down on a group on their first trip


Nobody was judging others based on the quality of clothing or gear. My comment concerns people who bring out clothes and gear, (obviously brand new - and not just one article mind you, but the entire kit) that has obviously never seen the light of day before that first campsite. One might think that someone spending big bucks on any first-time adventure, might at least take out the tissue paper out of the backpack before arrival...perhaps try to set up a tent once for themselves before hitting the trail, and maybe even consider reading the stove directions once too.

Makes no matter what gear you choose - a tube tent or tarptent - they all work and am not "judging" on the merits of these per se. Just questioning how much hand-holding should be required before an adult can fend for themselves.

BTW, calling someone an A$$hole here is a great way to get outed...thanks!
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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby sparky » Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:09 pm

Outed? Was I ever in? I'm solo bro, FTW. Heh, anyway my point is just because they dumped a bunch of coin on a new hobby doesn't mean they are clueless or incompetent. Let thier actions speak for themselves. Perhaps I am overly sensitive because some jerk projected his negative energy toward my crisp t shirt.

I never had a mentor, for pretty much anything. We figured things out for ourselves, and had a lot of fun doing it. Jerks will always come along and hate when they are better, faster, more knowledgeable ect.....and they stand out......as jerks ;-)

I just always see this us vs them mentallity in society. We are better than you because (blank). We all share the same love of travelling through the mountains is that not enough to garner some respect?

And don't get me wrong, I am not saying you should or should not do anything, despite my finger waving.. Icould really care less, but hoping to entertain some food for thought.

I personally believe the purpose of human consciousness is new experiences. So I am all for people trying new things.
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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby sparky » Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:18 pm

Oops and let me be clear that I have been guilty of being the judhemental jerk. It's just an ugly side of humanity. But being aware is important I think
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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby ManOfTooManySports » Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:57 am

I'm a middle-aged curmudgeon who has been hiking, literally, as long as I can remember. In some ways the mountains are worse than ever in all the ways you all have noted. It's crowded in some spots, there are yahoos in campgrounds, places are worn and trashed, etc., etc.

BUT!

I've also noticed that once you get away from the areas frequented by the dayhikers or one-night backpackers, things seem better. And if you go off the "glamour" routes (JMT, Rae Lakes Loop, Whitney, etc.) there seems to be fewer people than in the past, and those that you meet are pretty cool. It seems overall there is less trash on the trails, the trails are less cut-off, and the bear situation is much, much better.

One negative trend is that the Sierra High Route has become the new JMT, with people blasting through doing 20+ miles a day. Pretty soon the whole thing will be a well-trodden use trail. I guess I better do it soon to add to my trophies of having done Whitney, segments of the JMT, and the Rae Lakes Loop. :rolleyes:

People are getting lazier by the day. A population increase of 5 million lazybutts won't add many people to parts of the mountains you can't drive to. But it will put a lot of environmental pressure on the mountains, and the population that gives a crap about the mountains will become a smaller and less powerful minority than it is now.
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Re: Campground etiquette

Postby Hobbes » Thu Sep 01, 2011 12:07 pm

ManOfTooManySports wrote:If you go off the "glamour" routes (JMT, Rae Lakes Loop, Whitney, etc.) there seems to be fewer people than in the past, and those that you meet are pretty cool.


I don't know if you saw my AA day hike report (viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6925), but I concur that the name of the game is to find a wrinkle in the space-time continuum. And as an added benefit, those who you do happen to run into seem for the most part to be pretty cool & interesting.

While we were @ Silver, the crew spent one afternoon hiking the obligatory 20 lakes basin. While we didn't see too many people, the real revelation was made on the return ferry trip. I had a chance to talk to a 60+yo guy from NC who had just completed a 6 day BP trip. On his lay day before returning home, had hiked up the flank of N Peak, right up to the edge of the glacier. Even though he had started on a heavily used trial, simply by going off trail and doing a little scrambling, he had the entire range to himself.

I'm moving way more in that direction. By thinking through some of the possibilities on different routes, it's still possible to get a wilderness experience.
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