FLASH FLOOD WATCH 7/24

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maverick
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FLASH FLOOD WATCH 7/24

Post by maverick » Thu Jul 26, 2018 9:12 am

NWS:
...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM 3 PM THIS AFTERNOON TO 8 PM
PDT THIS EVENING...

The National Weather Service in Reno has issued a

- Flash Flood Watch for much of Western Nevada, the Eastern Sierra, and parts of the Lake Tahoe vicinity.

- From 3 PM this afternoon to 8 PM PDT this evening.

- Thunderstorms are expected to redevelop this afternoon with an enhanced risk of flash flooding and severe weather. Storms can rapidly produce 1-2 inches of rain resulting in flash flooding. The same storms will also be capable of producing large amounts of hail, frequent lightning, dust storms, and erratic outflow winds to 60 mph.

- The highest risk areas for flooding are those that have seen excessive rainfall the past three days. Also areas of steep terrain or recent burn scars will be prone to rock slides and debris flows. Large amounts of small hail can quickly produce winter-like driving conditions even if it`s July.

- Remain weather aware this afternoon and evening. Be prepared to take action if a warning is issued. Have a way to monitor radar and receive weather alerts.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

People in the watch area should continue to be aware of the possibility for heavy rainfall, avoid low lying areas, and be careful when approaching highway dips and underpasses. Severe storms with hail and high winds can develop rapidly. Be prepared for sudden changes in weather and road condition.


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BigMan
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Re: FLASH FLOOD WATCH 7/24

Post by BigMan » Sun Jul 29, 2018 8:34 am

When I was hiking in to Cottonwood Lakes on 7/25, some backpackers were leaving due to the intense hailstorm they endured on 7/24.

Then I experienced a hailstorm on 7/26 while hiking into Miter Basin. Saw lightening strike a tree less than 2000 feet away. Retreated to a lower meadow to camp, when I realized how cold I had become. Set up the tent on a bed of hail and got warm.

Then, on 7/29, a day for which the “wx now” forecast made no mention of thunderstorms, another intense hailstorm started at 11am, just as I was arriving at 11,924’ Iridescent Lake.

I’ve read “make no assumptions” and “prepare for the worst” so many times, but needed another reminder. Feeling very humbled.
In wilderness lies the hope of the world.

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