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Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

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Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

Postby maverick » Tue May 16, 2017 4:44 pm

See this recent ABC report? Maybe cutting back on those OTC pain meds while in the backcountry, might be prudent. I know some people who take them like candy, without even thinking about it twice.
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/report-lin ... d=47336271

Curcumin (400-500mg) occasionally, it decreases pain associated with post-operative, arthritic, and general pain symptoms. 2g is comparable to acetominophen in potency, plus it has a lot of beneficial affects: anti-inflammatory.

Ginger tea, or some root in food, for muscle pain and soreness.

Green tea at the end of the day, kills bacteria, that causes cavities and tooth decay.

Chewing on some Fennel or Caraway Seeds can ease an upset stomach.

Do you use any natural herbs or remedies in the backcountry for pain, infections, or other ailments?
I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org



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Re: Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

Postby rlown » Tue May 16, 2017 6:01 pm

maverick wrote:
Do you use any natural herbs or remedies in the backcountry for pain, infections, or other ailments?


No. I've had tooth issues and I swear by Vicodin or 3 advil to deal with it in the back country. If I think I have something more severe before I go, I don't go. Most drugs don't really work for me, other than those mentioned and antibiotics. Dog bit my finger and it was infected. Antibiotics worked as always. Hope to get the nail back but I'm not holding out hope. Right index finger, don't care. I'm left handed. :)
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Re: Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

Postby Wandering Daisy » Wed May 17, 2017 7:22 pm

If you already use natural remedies at home, by all means use them backpacking. But I do not think I will experiment with them on a backpack trip. Better to try at home and get the doesage right.

I have found that a lot of evening aches and pains just go away on their own as the night goes on and as the trip goes on. I do often take some Advil the first night out, but not every night. I find that listening to soothing music also gets my mind of minor aches. I am not inclined to take much medicine at home, or out in the wilderness. Herbal tea, of any variety, is always relaxing and soothes.

I do not know if the following are considered natural remidies. I regularly use is to soak my feet in cold water. I will do this a few times each day at rest breaks. I always take olive oil for cooking. I will rub that on my hands if they get dried out. On longer trips I take some lanoline or bag balm to prevent cracking of skin on fingers. I purposely slow down the last half hour of hiking to "cool down". Never just plop down after hard hiking- I keep moving around. Sometimes massaging and stretching at the end of the day helps. Same at start of the day- start slowly and increase the pace. Less aches and pains this way.
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Re: Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

Postby SSSdave » Wed May 24, 2017 8:22 am

Have a few aspirin in my pack in a bottle that must be more than a decade old and never opened. At home over decades, I've rarely taken any medicines. Thus am not a fan of those that take pain medicines frequently.

For a toothache or after a dental visit some ibuprofen at most and for a head cold sinus headache same. However over decades have only caught a cold about once every 3 years though I did catch influenza this spring that was rather brutal. Note also never take other head colds and flu cough and sinus medicines. Thus just like all our ancestors before this modern era, have never taken anything for trail aches and pains though know what that is. As a twentysomething I learned several times why over stressing one's body backpacking is unwise thus rarely do. Especially stupid is the mindset for a long long last day marathon out just so someone with a mental compulsion can have a beer and burger beyond trailheads.

The best natural remedy after any strenuous effort on the trail is rather simple though a majority of backcountry visitors would rather pull out their hair than do so because they are afraid because its...COLD. That is to very briefly jump into whatever lake or stream that is near one's camp. It is amazing how that rejuvenates, how one feels clean and refreshed after drying off. Makes the experience inside a clean down sleeping bag so much more pleasant. Has been a few years on this board since we last kicked that topic around so maybe I'll bring that back up this summer.

David
http://www.davidsenesac.com/2017_Trip_C ... les-0.html
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Re: Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

Postby Wandering Daisy » Wed May 24, 2017 11:10 am

I agree that over-stressing the body causes most aches and pains, including headaches, which can also be caused by dehydration or hunger. I recall that my "younger body" in my 20's could recover from overstressing a lot faster than my now "ancient body". Also, unhealed subtler injuries over the years adds up. I learned how to slow down when I took my 17-year old daughter on a very difficult 18-day off-trail backpack. She is a good backpacker, but had one pace- slow and steady and was never one to over-do anything (my layed-back B-personality child). Easier days meant less pain at the end of each day.

There is a saying we had at NOLS; "If you are hungry, thirsty, tired, or in pain; you are doing something wrong." Prevention is better than pills.
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Re: Natural Remedies in the Backcountry

Postby Ikan Mas » Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:42 pm

I found that ginger (candied) helps with the nausea of altitude sickness. Old Chinese remedy.

If I had a headache, I would go to my grandmother's standby analgesic, willow bark tea.
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