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Wild Mushrooms

Have a favorite trail recipe or technique you'd like to share? Please do! We also like reviews of various trail food products out there. The Backcountry Food Topix forum is the place to discuss all things related to food and nourishment while in the Sierra wilderness (as well as favorite trail head eateries).
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Wild Mushrooms

Postby vpoulin » Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:34 am

Most of you have provided me with some great information on our upcoming Sierra trip. One question I haven't asked is, "have any of you foraged for wild mushrooms in the High Sierra during early July?". You've got a few good ones that may be available, including King Bolete and the Giant Lentinus. Oyster mushrooms are spring species that may be found lower down. Sierra puffballs are possibly another, and known to be quite common in the Sierra Nevada. Puffballs are not great table fare, but Arora thinks this one is probably the best of the puffballs when found immature.



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Postby copeg » Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:36 pm

Vince, I ended up moving this to the backpacking forum...

I've hunted for mushrooms here in winter, but never seriously in the Sierra. On occasion I have spotted a mushroom worth eating (I can think of two times off the top of my head when I saw some Boletes - both after a good deal of rain had fallen in the previous week). Based on this experience I know that they are out there. As always with shrooms, I think you need to catch them at the right time (ie after a good amount of rain) and be in the right place - and given the terrain and weather of the sierra, that right time window may be extremely narrow. Maybe other's have had luckier experiences...
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Postby vpoulin » Tue Mar 06, 2007 3:49 pm

trailblazer wrote:Vince, I ended up moving this to the backpacking forum...

I've hunted for mushrooms here in winter, but never seriously in the Sierra. On occasion I have spotted a mushroom worth eating (I can think of two times off the top of my head when I saw some Boletes - both after a good deal of rain had fallen in the previous week). Based on this experience I know that they are out there. As always with shrooms, I think you need to catch them at the right time (ie after a good amount of rain) and be in the right place - and given the terrain and weather of the sierra, that right time window may be extremely narrow. Maybe other's have had luckier experiences...


good idea, lets see if the backpackers have their eyes open. There's just a possibility that at tree-line in the High Sierra's there may be more gold than just in trout.....season is everything
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Postby BSquared » Thu Mar 08, 2007 6:29 pm

trailblazer wrote:I can think of two times off the top of my head when I saw some Boletes - both after a good deal of rain had fallen in the previous week.

Boletes in the Sierra, eh? Hmmm... next time I'm out there I'll have to keep my eyes open. I've found literally pounds of them in the Snowy Range outside of Laramie, WY, but never run into any in the Sierra. Thanks for the tip!
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Postby vpoulin » Fri Mar 09, 2007 10:18 am

BSquared wrote:
trailblazer wrote:I can think of two times off the top of my head when I saw some Boletes - both after a good deal of rain had fallen in the previous week.

Boletes in the Sierra, eh? Hmmm... next time I'm out there I'll have to keep my eyes open. I've found literally pounds of them in the Snowy Range outside of Laramie, WY, but never run into any in the Sierra. Thanks for the tip!


eer the "heads-up", no one yet seems to have seen anything, but we will be looking come early July. You never know, wet seepages and late season snow melt may be enough to put something up. If no mushrooms, we'll settle for the wild onions, but both would be the ticket, especially the King Bolete, a treasure when found. Actually, nearly all boletes and leccinums make the best addition to a wilderness meal, but I don't see them listed for the High Sierra.
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Postby oldranger » Fri Mar 09, 2007 6:59 pm

I've never been into mushrooms much but I remember a fungus that grows on downed trees and stumps in the elevation of red fir forest that is bright orange and yellow that was reported to be pretty tasty.

Mike
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Never trust a fungus!

Postby Strider » Fri Mar 09, 2007 8:39 pm

Not Sierras, but some good pictures of boletes and chanterelles.

http://maryland.sierraclub.org/hc/pictu ... JugBay.asp

Personally, I don't trust multinucleate organisms.
'Hike long and perspire'
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Re: Never trust a fungus!

Postby BSquared » Sat Mar 10, 2007 8:50 am

Strider wrote:Personally, I don't trust multinucleate organisms.

Oh, come on, they're only BInucleate, and only the fruiting bodies! :) (Of course, those are the parts one eats...)
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Postby vpoulin » Sat Mar 10, 2007 9:19 pm

oldranger wrote:I've never been into mushrooms much but I remember a fungus that grows on downed trees and stumps in the elevation of red fir forest that is bright orange and yellow that was reported to be pretty tasty.

Mike


Mike - that one is called "Chicken of the Woods". It's a shelflike fungi that's pretty noticable by its color. It is edible and good provided its young and thoroughly cooked. I've pickled it and its very nice. However, it is a fall species.
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Re: Never trust a fungus!

Postby vpoulin » Sat Mar 10, 2007 9:25 pm

BSquared wrote:
Strider wrote:Personally, I don't trust multinucleate organisms.

Oh, come on, they're only BInucleate, and only the fruiting bodies! :) (Of course, those are the parts one eats...)


Agreed, there are lots of wild edible mushrooms out there, but the list of those that are really worthwhile is not that long. Even knowing just a few makes can make any trip afield much more enjoyable. All it takes is a little olive oil, some butter, salt, pepper, maybe a spice or two, and someone showing you the few that are completely safe. It's not any harder than identifying red pine.
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Postby StumbleBum » Mon Mar 12, 2007 3:28 pm

It's not any harder than identifying red pine.


Considering that red pine (Pinus resinosa) doesn't occur down here in the Sierras, and this is the HST forum, this strikes me as a little humorous. But then I do have a odd sense of humor. ;)
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Postby vpoulin » Mon Mar 12, 2007 3:53 pm

StumbleBum wrote:
It's not any harder than identifying red pine.


Considering that red pine (Pinus resinosa) doesn't occur down here in the Sierras, and this is the HST forum, this strikes me as a little humorous. But then I do have a odd sense of humor. ;)


how about red "face" with a glow of "magnifica", humor is good
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