Chocolate | High Sierra Topix  

Chocolate

Have a favorite trail recipe or technique you'd like to share? Please do! We also like reviews of various trail food products out there. The Backcountry Food Topix forum is the place to discuss all things related to food and nourishment while in the Sierra wilderness (as well as favorite trail head eateries).
User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby longri » Tue Oct 11, 2016 12:52 pm

That's interesting about the taste buds. I can certainly believe that there is physiological change that could play a part. But I don't believe that's the whole story. Tastes can change for other reasons. And I think the chocolate I've eaten in the past was different.

I used to love darkly roasted coffee but now I can't tolerate it. It's just too bitter. It lacks many of the subtle flavors of coffee. If I had lost taste sensitivity wouldn't you expect the opposite transition?

maverick wrote:Milk chocolate is pretty bland, things start to get a little more intense once you hit the 70% range, and even more so in the 80% and 90% range, just be careful, some manufacturers will try to balance the natural bitter flavor of the cocoa in these ranges with large amounts of sugar.

I'm not sure I understand. What else would they put in there besides sugar? Looking at the ingredients for those 70% and 85% Dandelion bars and there are only two: Cocoa beans and sugar.



User avatar
longri
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 555
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:13 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby maverick » Tue Oct 11, 2016 2:56 pm

I'm not sure I understand. What else would they put in there besides sugar? Looking at the ingredients for those 70% and 85% Dandelion bars and there are only two: Cocoa beans and sugar.


Vanilla and soy lecithin.

But I don't believe that's the whole story. Tastes can change for other reasons. And I think the chocolate I've eaten in the past was different.


Probably isn't, never is.
HST= Wilderness Adventurer who knows no bounds, except for their own imagination, and where the trail ends is where our adventures begin.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org
User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 8497
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby Ska-T » Mon Jan 16, 2017 2:50 pm

These chocolates you guys are discussing . . . don't melt after a few days of backpacking in July in a black bear canister?
User avatar
Ska-T
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 7:59 pm
Location: Huntington Beach
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby longri » Tue Jan 17, 2017 11:33 am

Ska-T wrote:These chocolates you guys are discussing . . . don't melt after a few days of backpacking in July in a black bear canister?

It can but not necessarily. It depends. If you set a canister in the sun for hours everything will get hot. But if you pack the chocolate deep in the canister in your pack and then keep it in the shade when you stop it often does just fine. I've been on walks where the temperature was in the 90s and I melted but the chocolate was perfect.

Actually the more common problem I encounter in the Sierra is chocolate that's too cold in the evening and needs to be warmed up with a sip of tea to be properly enjoyed.
User avatar
longri
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 555
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:13 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby maverick » Tue Jan 17, 2017 1:35 pm

These chocolates you guys are discussing . . . don't melt after a few days of backpacking in July in a black bear canister?


They can, especially if the temps are very warm, but most of the time it doesn't last that long. :unibrow:
Unless of course it is being taken to a Meet-up like last year, and it did melt, though waiting until the evening or morning would have allowed it to re-harden.

Dark chocolate contains much high cocoa butter/fat, which is made of 6 different crystal forms that become liquid when exposed to heat, the higher the cocoa content the faster it is likely to melt. Its dark color doesn't help either, compared to the pale color of milk choc or the white color of white choc.
HST= Wilderness Adventurer who knows no bounds, except for their own imagination, and where the trail ends is where our adventures begin.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org
User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 8497
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby longri » Tue Jan 17, 2017 3:23 pm

maverick wrote:Dark chocolate contains much high cocoa butter/fat, which is made of 6 different crystal forms that become liquid when exposed to heat, the higher the cocoa content the faster it is likely to melt. Its dark color doesn't help either, compared to the pale color of milk choc or the white color of white choc.

My understanding is that chocolate is "tempered", a process of heating and cooling to specific temperatures in order to encourage the development of a single particular crystalline form with a sharp melting point. Since it's the fat the melts it's not clear to me that having a higher ratio of cocoa butter to sugar would matter that much. But maybe it does, I don't know.

Milk chocolate on the other hand has milk fat as well as cocoa butter. I thought that combination resulted in a lower melting temperature?

If the chocolate melts it won't taste the same when it hardens again. Not unless you re-temper it.
User avatar
longri
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 555
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:13 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby maverick » Tue Jan 17, 2017 3:57 pm

If the chocolate melts it won't taste the same when it hardens again. Not unless you re-temper it.


Not always the case, even blooming does not change the taste, only the appearance. All said, to be sure to get the ultimate quality, it needs care.

Milk chocolate on the other hand has milk fat as well as cocoa butter. I thought that combination resulted in a lower melting temperature?


Adding milk, sugar, fats and other ingredients slow the melting because these ingredients have different melting points, white chocolate melts the fastest of the three.
HST= Wilderness Adventurer who knows no bounds, except for their own imagination, and where the trail ends is where our adventures begin.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org
User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 8497
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby longri » Tue Jan 17, 2017 4:38 pm

maverick wrote:...blooming does not change the taste, only the appearance.

Really? I think it tastes different. Maybe it's only a textural difference I detect. I've never done a blind tasting of two otherwise identical chocolates, one bloomed and the other not -- I think it would surprise me if I couldn't tell them apart blinded.

maverick wrote:All said, to be sure to get the ultimate quality, it needs care.

Agree 100%. When I'm pretty sure the chocolate will melt on a trip I leave it behind.

maverick wrote:Adding milk, sugar, fats and other ingredients slow the melting because these ingredients have different melting points, white chocolate melts the fastest of the three.

Are you sure it isn't more complicated? It's possible to have a mixture of ingredients with a lower melting point than any of the constituent melting points.

I've never really thought about it all that much before. I've just tried to keep the chocolate from getting too warm!
User avatar
longri
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 555
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:13 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby Tom_H » Tue Jan 17, 2017 6:45 pm

In the summer of '75 I lived just uphill from the Lindt and Sprüngli chocolate factory on the Zurich Sea. The fragrance was always wafting uphill and drove me crazy. That was my introduction to the Alps and to good chocolate. Their liquid caramel filled milk chocolate bars were my favorite. In Hawai'i you can get Dole milk chocolate covered pineapple chunks-SO GOOD!
User avatar
Tom_H
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 530
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 12:11 pm
Location: Elk Grove, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby Oubliet » Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:07 pm

There is a chocolate bar sold in markets in Spain, Condis, that is very good, imho.

I have friends in Barcelona that occasionally bring me a supply when they're backcountry in California to visit.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
User avatar
Oubliet
Topix Acquainted
 
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:10 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby Oubliet » Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:08 pm

You must register an account and login to view files/photos attached to this post.

IMG_20170117_200354.jpg
IMG_20170117_200402.jpg


Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
User avatar
Oubliet
Topix Acquainted
 
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:10 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Chocolate

Postby maverick » Wed Jan 18, 2017 11:26 am

By the way, the top chocolate bar (winner) cocoa beans were sourced from Mexico: http://www.internationalchocolateawards ... ners-2016/
Can hardly wait to get my hands on some. :)
HST= Wilderness Adventurer who knows no bounds, except for their own imagination, and where the trail ends is where our adventures begin.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org
User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 8497
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

PreviousNext

Return to Backcountry Food Topix



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests