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Homemade Beef Jerky Question

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Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby InsaneBoost » Fri Dec 05, 2014 10:15 am

I'm going to attempt to make homemade beef jerky this weekend as I was able to finally buy a dehydrator for some meal making. I was wondering about storing it?

From what I recall, someone said if you plan on eating it within about three months you can easily put them in plastic bags that will seal. After that they recommended vacuum sealing it and putting it in the freezer until it was ready to be used.

I thought I got that advice on here, but after searching (maybe I'm just bad at searching), I couldn't come across it, so maybe I just read it somewhere else.

Regardless, I wanted to make sure that was true and okay? I personally don't plan on it being around that long. My guess would be 2 months top, but even that I don't see. I'm not making a lot of it, just enough for a trial run and a little day hike in Yosemite.

Will it be okay in regular plastic bags as long as I eat it in three months? Or should I get a vacuum sealer and store it in the fridge until I plan on hiking?

Thanks



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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby maverick » Fri Dec 05, 2014 1:15 pm

This should answer your question: http://beefjerkyrecipes.com/storing/
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby InsaneBoost » Fri Dec 05, 2014 2:43 pm

Thanks. Some really good information there.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby rlown » Fri Dec 05, 2014 3:02 pm

it's a noble cause to do it yourself. don't. buy what you need when you go and be done with it. Ziplocks will leave a taste after a month. The vacuum solution works better in a deep freeze, but why?

Just asking.

Russ
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby Jimr » Fri Dec 05, 2014 5:38 pm

I used to make a lot of beef and turkey jerky. It never hung around very long.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby TahoeJeff » Sat Dec 06, 2014 12:04 pm

Raley's supermarket sells thin lamb flank steaks. They are pretty darn lean and not super "gamey" like some cuts of lamb. They make an excellent jerky, especially when seasoned with curry powder and/or chana masala.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby Hobbes » Sat Dec 06, 2014 5:04 pm

You can make a batch in your oven right before a trip; I used to do it all the time. Cut all the fat off, make sure the strips soak overnight in marinade, and let them cook/dehydrate in the oven for 2-5hrs at 175 degrees:

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-homemad ... rkey-95962

Also, go a supermarket that has a 'real' butcher, and let him/her cut the 1/4" strips beforehand.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby Jimr » Sat Dec 06, 2014 7:51 pm

I have the butcher cut mine as well. I've not used the oven for jerky, but I've used it to dry several meals. I put it on its lowest setting, wedge a wooden spoon in the door to keep it open a bit, then blow a small fan across the top to circulate the air. Works great.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby John Harper » Sun Dec 07, 2014 10:28 am

I usually try to find a good size eye of round roast, slice it as thin as possible while keeping your fingers. Marinate in Yoshida's Teriyaki Marinade mixed with crushed chiles (I like spicy), for a day or so. I then put in my Little Chief smoker with just a wee bit of chips, the red meats pick up too much smoke if you overdo it IMO. Let it go as just a dryer after the smoke stops and check it at the end of the day. If not a nice dark color, finish in oven at 190* unti dark and shiny. The Yoshida's gives it great flavor.

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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby Dave_Ayers » Mon Dec 08, 2014 2:54 pm

I've been making my own jerky for many years. I wouldn't use a dehydrator. The reasonably priced ones like the Nesco don't have enough power and take too long. An oven at ~200 or a bit more works better, only taking perhaps 6 hours.

I generally don't use beef as it's relatively tough to chew. IMO, pork sirloin, chicken, and turkey are usually more tender.

The shortest length of time I've ever observed jerky getting any mold sitting in a zip-loc at room temperature was 1 month. But that was for a particularly moist batch for home eating, not the drier version for backpacking. It's hard for me to say much beyond that because it simply doesn't last. If I have some leftover, folks scarf it down quickly.

I'd add some lemon juice (citric acid) and/or ascorbic acid (AKA vitamin C, in the Fruit Fresh product) to the marinade. They serve as decent (relatively) natural preservatives.

One of the many advantages of making your own jerky is that you can dry it as much as you like and not have to chew the 'leather' like you do with most store-bought brands. Another is that you can use fatter (marbled) cuts of meat to increase the Cal/oz. The commercial jerkies I've looked at all had poor Calorie densities. I easily achieve a third or more higher.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby JWreno » Fri Feb 06, 2015 5:00 pm

We make it a few days or weeks before the trips and it goes in gallon ziplock bags. It never hangs around long enough to get stale. It might be a few weeks old if it goes in a resupply package that needs to be shipped. The advantage of making it yourself, is you can make how you want it and not eat stuff a year old. We use a 5 tray Excalabur unit that we also use to dry all our fruit for the trail.
If we have left over we just put the bag in the fridge I take it to work for snacks until its gone. Never let it go long enough to go bad.
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Re: Homemade Beef Jerky Question

Postby InsaneBoost » Fri Apr 17, 2015 12:01 pm

Didn't want to make a new thread being this was still on the first page close to the top, so I thought I'd ask about this being it was something I didn't like.

I made two batches, and finally did get a flavor I liked after playing with some recipes. With that said the 1/4" cuts I'm not a fan of, unless I just dried them way too long.

Mine weren't like bacon where it's cooked too long and crumbles, but when eating it was still rather harder/dryer, and I'm a fan of the softer chewier kind. Such as the thick pieces you would find in your typical beef jerky at a store like Jack Links, etc, the thick small pieces that aren't dried out and are super soft.

How would I go about doing something like this? Cut them thicker? But let them dry the same? Cut them the same, but don't dry them as long?

I'm fine with playing around a bit, just don't want to get super sick.
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