Burning calories Question

How do you prepare for the rigorous physical requirements of high elevation adventure? Strength and endurance are key, but are only part of a more complex equation. How do you prepare for changes in altitude, exposure, diet, etc.? How do you mentally prepare? Learn from others and share what you know about training in advance for outdoor adventures.
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Wandering Daisy
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Re: Burning calories Question

Post by Wandering Daisy » Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:19 am

My husband just bought me a Garmin smart watch and it has been fun to track activities and calories (fully aware that these devices can be significantly off). Supposedly I burn about 400-500 calories sleeping (I am a very wiggly sleeper). Amazingly I accumulate nearly 2-3 miles a day simply be doing regular chores, shopping, cleaning, etc. My 3-4 mile dog walks supposedly burn about 700 calories. My "non-exercise" calorie burn exceed my exercise calorie burn unless I do an all-day hike. I guess this really reinforces the idea that being sedentary is a big factor in weight gain. Backpacking puts us in an environment without chairs, which makes us more active even when we are not actually walking.I have yet to see how many calories I burn for a day of yard work or gardening.

Another observation; my I-phone records less miles than the Garmin watch. We have several zones where I walk where cell coverage is poor. I think the I-phone looses miles when switching from cell tracking to satellite tracking. But the I really do not understand how the I-phone calculates its miles. Unfortunately the Garmin watch I have does not have enough battery power to use as a GPS to track my miles while backpacking, unless I buy a solar charger, so I will not be using it to track backpacking.








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longri
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Re: Burning calories Question

Post by longri » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:26 am

Wandering Daisy wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:19 am
Supposedly I burn about 400-500 calories sleeping (I am a very wiggly sleeper).
You can roughly estimate that based on weight. It won't be accurate but will get you in the ballpark. If you sleep 8 hours and burn 500 Cal that would suggest you weigh something like 125 lbs, give or take.

Wandering Daisy wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:19 am
Another observation; my I-phone records less miles than the Garmin watch. We have several zones where I walk where cell coverage is poor. I think the I-phone looses miles when switching from cell tracking to satellite tracking. But the I really do not understand how the I-phone calculates its miles. Unfortunately the Garmin watch I have does not have enough battery power to use as a GPS to track my miles while backpacking, unless I buy a solar charger, so I will not be using it to track backpacking.
My wife carries around an altimeter, an iPhone, and a pedometer. Each of them has their own idiosyncrasies and they rarely agree. Sometimes one of them is wildly off. But they are kind of fun toys. And they can be used as metrics for monitoring activity level, just not accurately.

My understanding is that the iPhone Health app uses the GPS chip to determine distance, not the cell signal. So it suffers from the same inaccuracies as other GPS based distance calculations. Way better than a pedometer though.

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bobby49
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Re: Burning calories Question

Post by bobby49 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 12:26 pm

There is no industry standard or market standard on how a GPS receiver works or how its algorithms determine miles traveled. So, your results will vary from brand to brand and even the usage profile within a single brand. For example, suppose that you are going through a mountain tunnel from Point A to Point B. With some of these, the track sees Point A, the signal is blocked in the tunnel, and then it sees Point B. It makes the assumption that you actually traveled in a straight line from A to B, so it records that distance. With others, it makes the assumption that nothing happened while the signal was lost in the tunnel, so it does not record the tunnel distance. What is important for the user is to learn the particular GPS item in hand and to understand how its algorithms work.

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