Cameras

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tlsharb
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Cameras

Post by tlsharb » Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:03 am

So every year I go to the Sierra, and I'm reminded how crappy my little Nikon Coolpix is. Everyone taking pics with their Iphones (which I don't have) look way better than anything I'm taking. Thus it is time to upgrade. Problem is, I know nothing about cameras. Any suggestions? I'd like to keep it sane pricewise (under $400) and light. I also own a Canon Rebel, which takes great shots, but is pretty heavy. I may end up hauling it along this year, but would prefer another, lighter option.
ts








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AlmostThere
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Re: Cameras

Post by AlmostThere » Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:43 am

I've lost and killed so many little crappy cameras... I still have a Coolpix tho. If I were going to buy another camera I would get one of the Panasonic Lumix versions, as they seem to take better pics than most of the low end point and shoots.

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longri
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Re: Cameras

Post by longri » Mon Jun 18, 2018 9:47 am

iPhones can take great shots but come up short when objects are either far away or really close. Even a relatively inexpensive point and shoot camera can usually beat an iPhone in those circumstances. And battery life is another bugaboo for phones.

You didn't mention which Coolpix you own. That product line encompasses a wide range.

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bobby49
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Re: Cameras

Post by bobby49 » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:26 am

You can do a better job of choosing a camera if you can prioritize your subjects. For example, if it is general scenery that you shoot, just about any camera can do that. If it is distant wildlife that you shoot, it will require something with a very long focal length. If it is wildflowers, then your technique becomes important.

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tlsharb
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Re: Cameras

Post by tlsharb » Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:02 am

The Coolpix I have is the definite low end ($100ish). What I really noticed about it's shortcomings, is that when you are taking pics of a basin (like Blackcap), the granite peaks really wash out and you lose contrast. People pics are fine, and snapping a quickie of the last trout is OK.....it is mostly the "big pic" ones that come up short.
ts

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longri
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Re: Cameras

Post by longri » Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:07 pm

Are your friends' iPhones really producing photos that are superior?

When I compare scenic photos from my small P&S camera and my iPhone I think that they're pretty similar, which is to say they are acceptable snapshots, not high quality photographs. If anything, the camera does a slightly better job on average. Quality aside, the zoom, macro, and small removable battery that lasts about a week are features lacking in a phone.

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bobby49
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Re: Cameras

Post by bobby49 » Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:16 pm

tlsharb wrote:The Coolpix I have is the definite low end ($100ish). What I really noticed about it's shortcomings, is that when you are taking pics of a basin (like Blackcap), the granite peaks really wash out and you lose contrast. People pics are fine, and snapping a quickie of the last trout is OK.....it is mostly the "big pic" ones that come up short.
ts
It helps if you use a camera that can handle a polarizer.

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maverick
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Re: Cameras

Post by maverick » Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:31 pm

it is mostly the "big pic" ones that come up short.
Care to post a couple of examples.

You have to ask yourself truthfully, what will I be doing with my photo's? Web sharing and possible 8x10's, or would you like to print larger for your own home or friends? There is no need to over spend, there are many point and shoots that do a decent job for the above requirements. Folks way over spend on features they will never use, sometimes just learning the functions of a camera, how to use them properly, creatively, and reading about composition and light, can expand your knowledge, and the way your interpret a scene. You need to be controlling the creative output of the camera and not the other way around. :)
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oleander
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Re: Cameras

Post by oleander » Mon Jun 18, 2018 10:15 pm

I have found my Canon Powershot S100 12.1 megapixel camera (7 ounces) to be the perfect upgrade over my former $100 camera. You can get it refurbished for around $150.

However, part of the reason I like it is that it has some unusually advanced features for a point-and-shoot, and I was dedicated to learning technique using those features. (Examples of those features: built-in filters; bracketing; TV, AV priority, and manual settings; ability to take RAW photos.) Also, for a point-and-shoot, it can take photos at a decently wide angle, which I prefer for landscape photography.

I haven't posted many photos on here recently such that you could judge what you think of the pictures it takes. However, Bluewater has an S95 (the model year before mine) and his many photos posted around here for the past several years are all taken on that camera. Great photos but 99% of that is because Bluewater trained himself extensively on how to use that camera. Amazing photos for such an inexpensive camera.

You can buy a skinny, magnetic, circular polarizer lens for this camera. It adds no weight, about $30 in cost, and dramatically improves a lot of my daytime photos which would otherwise tend to have a lot of glare.

If you don't realistically think you'll (want to) learn the technique involved to take advantage of those kinds of features - time can be short and patience thin to learn new stuff this very time of year when we're just trying to get out the door to our backpacking trips - then buy a simpler, cheaper and lighter camera without those features.

If you do consider my Canon, don't mix it up with the very similarly-named Canon S100 Elph, which is a watered-down point-and-shoot similar to what you have right now.

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tlsharb
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Re: Cameras

Post by tlsharb » Tue Jun 19, 2018 4:59 am

Wow, lot of good input here. Thanks so much. To Maverick-- what I mostly do with pics is store them in my computer to look at and share with others. Definitely not looking to make large prints or anything like that. To Elizabeth-- I actually do enjoy learning how to use complicated stuff. Once upon a time I was snapping pictures with a Pentax ME, and knew how to get the best out of that thing. Of course that was a million years ago, and that knowledge has long since slipped away (but it could be brought back to the surface I would suspect).
Once again, many thanks.
ts

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