Time for a new backpacking camera

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bobby49
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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by bobby49 » Mon Apr 23, 2018 1:20 pm

I was using a heavy Canon DSLR up until about 5 years ago. Then I wanted to reduce overall weight and also improve zoom capability for wildlife. With a Canon SX50HS, I accomplished both of those. Then last year I needed to reduce weight again for a trip on the High Sierra Trail. With a Canon Powershot ELPH 180, I accomplished that. So, for any trip now, I have to decide what my photographic subject possibilities are and balance those against carried weight.








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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by Wandering Daisy » Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:59 am

How many photos can you get on the Elf before you have to recharge the battery or put in a spare? I have a Cannon S95 (battery life is really good) and am considering also buying an Elf (they are not expensive) as a supplemental camera. How would you compare the photo quality? The S95 has lots of settings and options (such as shooting RAW format), but I tend not to use them as much as I thought I would. I am mainly interested in photo quality and battery life.

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maverick
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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by maverick » Tue Apr 24, 2018 12:11 pm

How many photos can you get on the Elf before you have to recharge the battery or put in a spare?
Canon:
Shooting Capacity
Approx. 220 shots
Approx. 300 shots in ECO Mode
https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/cata ... 180-silver
How would you compare the photo quality?
http://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon ... erShot-S95
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I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by bobby49 » Tue Apr 24, 2018 2:21 pm

Wandering Daisy wrote:How many photos can you get on the Elf before you have to recharge the battery or put in a spare? I have a Cannon S95 (battery life is really good) and am considering also buying an Elf (they are not expensive) as a supplemental camera. How would you compare the photo quality? The S95 has lots of settings and options (such as shooting RAW format), but I tend not to use them as much as I thought I would. I am mainly interested in photo quality and battery life.
How many photos on one battery? I don't know for sure. I purchased this camera last year in preparation for my High Sierra Trail trip. I started with the original battery, and I had three spares in the case since I didn't know much about the battery life. I finished the trip in six days, and I shot about 275 frames. It was still operating on that original battery, so I never got to the dead battery stage. What I don't enjoy is that it has no RAW capability, and I am used to that on all of my other cameras. However, so far the automatic exposures are pretty close, so I have not had to do much exposure recovery in post processing. Yes, these small cameras get a lot done in software, so there are many more shooting options than I would ever need. The small size and small weight were the big selling factors for me. Right now I am preparing for some cave photography, so that brings in a whole new set of challenges. I can't compare the ELPH photo quality to a Canon S95 since I've never seen an S95. The problem with lots of these small cameras is that they use a motorized process to open up the lens and extend it, and that uses battery power. None of my DSLR cameras do that, but they have serious electromagnetic shutters which the small cameras do not have.

OTOH, I am preparing for at least one backpacking trip that is all about wildlife that is fairly distant. So, I'll likely carry my Canon SX50HS for the extreme zoom capability.

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by Wandering Daisy » Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:41 pm

Mav- thanks for that link. I get the idea, although a lot of technical stuff that went over my head. Seems like the S95 is "better" except for weight. Lighter is better, but the S95 weight really is not a big factor, since I carry the camera clipped on my hip belt, so it does not add to pack weight. I really need to spend some more time figuring out all the settings I can do with it. My biggest problem (with ALL thouch screen camera menus) is that I have a heck of a time reading the screen. I have also had the top dials on the camera accidently turn to "low light" when I shove it in and out of the case. In my opinion, they turn too easily.

It was my understanding that the true resolution is the sensor size, not the output pixels. I thought more pixel output was simply the camera algorithms resampling and making more pixels - the base data comes from the sensor size. Am I wrong on that?

Bobby49, I have one spare battery for my Cannon S95. I usually have to use it on a 10-12 day trip. I take about 300 photos, but NEVER just turn the camera on to look at photos already taken. I usually have to put in the second battery about 8 days in. My camera does not have much zoom, but then I rarely use it anyway. Sounds like the Elf battery is similar in battery life.

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by maverick » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:13 pm

Don't want to get of topic WD, here is a link that will explain it: https://photographylife.com/camera-resolution-explained
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I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by JWreno » Tue Jan 08, 2019 7:53 am

We bought the RX100 III before our 2014 JMT trip. My wife carried the RX100 and I was crazy enough to carry a Canon 6D with the 16-35 IS zoom. We both enjoyed taking a lot of photos. The DSLR was great for early morning and evening light. I will never carry that much camera again on a trip when I am also carrying 12 days of food.

On our last 3 trips we only carried the RX100. I find that I miss having a camera for each of us. Yesterday I order the newer RX100 VI. It has a 24-200 zoom but has a slower lens. If I didn't already have the RX100 III I probably would have purchased the RX100 VA which has the faster 24-70 zoom Under full daylight the longer zoom will give us some more reach and we can still use the older RX100 for the lower light stuff. I love the electronic OLED viewfinders and wouldn't consider a camera that doesn't have a true viewfinder. It is very useful under the bright sunshine to have a real viewfinder to look through.

We also own the Sony RX10 II which has a faster 24-70 constant f/2.8 lens. It is a great camera and does really great 4K video without the 5 minute limit of the newer RX100 models. I enjoy it as a shorter trip or day hiking camera when I don't fell like luging my Canon 6D with a couple of heavy zooms.

We have printed a lot of our nicer photos with the Epson 2880 printer and the 20 megapixel RX100 hold up nicely on the large printed photos. We also love watching slideshows on our 65 inch OLED 4K TV. Watching slide shows of previous trips reminds us how much we enjoy the trips and motivates us to plan and train for future trips.

The RX100 size is small enough that a weight sensitive hiker wouldn't regret bringing the camera. We have found that that we get many more quality photos if each of us are carrying a camera on the trip.
Jeff

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by bobby49 » Tue Jan 08, 2019 1:24 pm

It depends. On some trips I am not going that far, so I will carry a full DSLR, tripod, flash, and the whole nine yards. If I am going farther and carrying more weight, then I carry a bridge camera with a super lens, and that is mostly for distant wildlife. If I am going farther yet and going faster, then I carry a small pocket camera. It isn't great for distant wildlife, but it is good enough for a bear or a marmot at 20 feet.

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by JWreno » Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:15 pm

I think the factors for me are the number of days before resupply of food and the number of miles per day with pack on. I haven't done any base camp type trips where we hike in for a couple of days and just setup camp for 3-4 to explore an area. I would definitely bring the DSLR, tripod, fast some and astrophotography prime or two.

Most of our on trail days are 12-15 miles per day. Off trail route finding may only be 4-8 miles depending on difficulties. I am usually too tired to enjoy the night skies except for maybe 20 minutes in the middle of the night when nature calls.

I want to do a couple of nights early in the season in Glen Aulin so we could shoot some great video and photos of all the falls below Glen Aulin. I did this in 2002 with an analog video camera. It would be great to do it again with 4K video. I would bring the Sony RX10 II for the video and photos.

I will be old enough to buy a lifetime senior national park pass in early June. Sounds like a good time to see some snow and water in Yosemite.
Jeff

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Re: Time for a new backpacking camera

Post by JWreno » Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:29 pm

I just put in a trip request for a couple of nights at Glen Aulin in the 1st half of June. Hope to see a lot of water but still cross the bridge at Glen Aulin.

My son can carry one canister with everyones food. My wife can carry the full tent and stove. I will bring my Canon 6D and the Sony RX10 II for video plus a tripod.

I think we might plan a few more couple more 2 nighters where I only take Fridays off for the trip. More chances for more photography.
Jeff

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