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JMT Gear List

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JMT Gear List

Postby venturefar » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:03 am

Getting ready to head out on the JMT on the fourth. This last week has been a little crazy putting the final touches on gear selection and packing our resupply buckets. I've enjoyed reading other members gear lists posted in the past so I thought I'd share my JMT kit:

http://www.geargrams.com/list?id=13029



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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby Wandering Daisy » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:34 am

Thanks for sharing! I am so old fashioned- cannot relate to "grams". Pounds and ounces for me!

I would delete a few things, but you probably have good reason to take them. A few ideas IF you are still looking to reduce weight.

I never carry a day pack, when I day hike I just cinch up my regular pack and use it. I have switched to using a large compactor garbage bag inside my pack- weighs less, works, and does not get whipped around by wind. I also quit taking rain pants in the Sierra in the summer. Since I am not into electronic stuff, I would ditch the I-phone. I also do not use a GPS. I use a down "sweater" at 4 oz. rather than a jacket (yours may be just as light but grams do not compute with me). Never use a pillow, just stuff clothing inside a stuff. Switching all stuff sacks to the lightest silnylon ones is expensive, but does save weight (you may have already done this). I never take a fishing net. Yes, that means that some get away, but so be it.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby longri » Fri Jun 28, 2013 10:49 am

Thanks for posting that. I'm always curious what people carry. There's a huge variation in what people think is important or desirable to take. Even with my hiking companions I can't really see everything that they have and I don't ask them to spread it all out. I'd never heard of "shade gloves" before.

Ms. Daisy -- no rainpants? Don't your legs get wet and cold while hiking in the rain?
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby Wandering Daisy » Fri Jun 28, 2013 12:54 pm

After years of hauling rain pants, I found that they: leaked (light weight ones) after significant rain, or the pants that did not leak were really heavy, more than 70% of the time I did not even use them, and in my old age, I simply do not walk in the rain (just hole up and wait for it to pass and make up the miles after the rain stops). Good thing that I solo, off-trail so nobody sees me, but now if it rains and I HAVE to walk, I take off my hiking pants, put on the rain parka, and hike on, a bit bare on the bottom. If it is very light rain, I find that my nylon hiking pants stay pretty dry anyway. I DO take rain pants in the Rockies (abundant severe afternoon storms) or Pacific Northwest (days of drizzles). I just think mid-summer in the Sierra, it is easier for me to simply adapt my hiking schedule to avoid the rain.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby Wandering Daisy » Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:03 pm

What I assume you mean by "shade gloves" are gloves that protect your hands from sun. On long trips, about half the time I wear light weight very breathable cheap garden gloves. My skin simply cannot tolerate either the sun or wear and tear of the trekking poles. Additionally, the gloves keep mosquitoes from biting my hands; I hesitate to use DEET on my hands since I cannot keep from putting my fingers near my eyes (ouch!! with DEET). If there are not mosquitoes I cut of the finger tips to make fingerless gloves which keep my hands cooler.

I found it amusing that when I did the SHR, I would run across JMT hikers and all the young folks would be in short shorts, head bare, skin exposed, tight t-shirts, very stylish. When I ran across an older person, I would laugh, because they were dressed just like me- very unstylish, gloves, loose long sleeve shirts, those silly hats with side flaps, long pants, gaiters, and trekking poles.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby longri » Fri Jun 28, 2013 5:30 pm

I don't know what your definition of "old" is, Daisy, but I wear shorts because I find pants bind on my legs and impede movement. I know the sun is damaging and sunscreen a poor defense.

So you leave the rainpants at home and wear pants. I leave the pants at home and carry lightweight rainpants. Although not very often, sometimes I need them.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby AlmostThere » Fri Jun 28, 2013 5:51 pm

I have gone through lots of pants, but stick with them. Pants do not have to bind - you just need the right ones for your body shape. Light nylon pants are invaluable. They dry fast.

I too gave up on carrying rain pants in the Sierra unless it's cold. I rarely take a jacket. I use a poncho and if it is warm enough, I don't bother wearing that. I usually have a dry base layer to sleep in even if by some miracle I'm still damp at bedtime....Tho I have been known to make a rain skirt out of a trash back and duct tape.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby longri » Fri Jun 28, 2013 6:19 pm

AlmostThere wrote:I have gone through lots of pants, but stick with them. Pants do not have to bind - you just need the right ones for your body shape.

Aye, there's the "rub". Finding pants that don't. I haven't been successful, whereas short shorts feel free and light to me. I'll be getting a cancer on my face before my legs anyhow.

To me, raingear is a survival suit. Caught out away from my shelter it might be what keeps me okay, or at least I hope. When cutting corners I remove the first aid stuff before I drop the waterproof shells.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby venturefar » Fri Jun 28, 2013 7:21 pm

Thanks everyone I appreciate the suggestions. I love the discussion on gear choices. Drivefly and I have been doing this for months. There is often a lot to learn from seeing what other pack along. Most of the time you can tell someone's ulterior motive for entering the backcountry. Whether it be photographer or fisherman you can tell what someone likes to do by looking at their kit. I'll attempt to explain the rationale behind some of my gear choices.

Usually with rain pants I bring them early and late in the season because I've been snowed on too many times. For this trip I decided I wanted to bring a change of pants because I plan on doing laundry at our resupply stops if not along the way and I wanted a change of clothes to wear while washing my dirty stuff. I'm sure Drivefly will appreciate me not going all "Naked and Afraid" while doing the laundry. Plus If mosquitoes are their normal abundant July presence there's that to consider. I discovered while weighing my gear my rain pants are actually slightly lighter (281g vs 312g) than my convertible pants. I figured why not take the rain pants.

I admit I added a few cushy items. The bag, pad, and pillow are all upgrades for me. I've got no problem suffering for a week, but for 24 days I wanted to be comfortable. I sleep a little cold and my old bag and pad were due for replacement.

The day pack is pretty light for its volume. I pack all my fishing gear in it on the trail. During day hikes it will carry all of my fishing gear plus my lunch, filter, camera, and water bottle. I lash the net to the side. All my photos are achieved by holding the fish underwater in the net while I get the camera ready. I think its better for the fish and I feel more confident I'll b able to land the big one if I'm lucky enough to hook one again.

I considered bringing less socks especially considering plan to do laundry. I just love clean socks.

Thanks again for any suggestions.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby Wandering Daisy » Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:27 pm

In the old days, the normal get-up for climbers was to hike in gym shorts, with wool long johns under the shorts. No binding, sun protection and we were usually up high enough that it was not too hot. You also could try a kilt! There are some guys who swear by kilts. There are a multitude of options! Bicycle clothing and climbing clothing are also often suited for backpack use.

I find that I have to buy high-end pants to get a good fit. I like the articulated knees that are found in climbing pants. My current hiking pants are Arcterx men's pants. I also have schoeller climbing pants, that are nearly waterproof, tough as nails, and stretchy too - if I use these I take no long johns. I fell into a stream once with my scholeller pants and got out, brushed them off, and they were still dry. I do a lot of off-trail travel, so shorts are not an option. I even use knee high gaiters when I anticipate serious bushwhacking.

I think you need to evaluate your gear and if you rarely use an item, seriously think about deleting it or finding the lightest substitute possible. I am barely into the "light" category, let alone "ultra-light". It takes me a long time to decide to delete a piece of gear. Every trip I am aiming to go lighter - it is an ongoing process. For me, the longer the trip, the LESS I care about creature comforts! My body adapts, I do not get as cold, and I sleep well even on the most minimal sleeping pad. The farther I get from civilization the less I want of it.
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby sparky » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:54 pm

I have mentioned this a few times but I will say it again. I am a believer in wool pants. They are cool when warm and warm when cool, have withstood lots of bushwacking and scrambling, fit great and are really comfortable. Light rain doesnt do any damage. Not to mention super cheap @ thrift store. I have dropped some coin on fancy pants and nothing compares to my 2$ wool pants :-)
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Re: JMT Gear List

Postby freestone » Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:28 am

If you don't mind, I would like to add some comments and suggestions as well. You are at 34.8 pounds of clothing and gear and there is no food in the pack yet, that's borderline heavy.

Clothing- take a down jacket or fleece but not both, down has the best warmth to weight ratio. No rain pants or jacket, get a trekking umbrella or set up your tarp until the threat of rain passes. Sierra rain can be very fickle and scattered brief showers are more common than daylong downpours.

Fishing- take only one pole. Use a Ketchem quick release tool instead of a net. The JMT is more about daily miles, and less about fishing.

Equipment- No shovel and trowel. One or the other, or neither. Use a tent peg or heal instead. No compass, the JMT is well marked. No towel, bring two bandanas instead.

Cooking- No Nalgene bottles, a Gatoraide bottle instead. No bucket, the water filter system has capacity or use your Schnozzel bag for carrying water, and for an internal water proof bag liner. Those things are huge!

Shelter- Tarp Tent is a lightweight shelter, but for the JMT I would consider just a tarp for emergency shelter only, and plan on cowboy camping for most of the trip.

Have a great trip and good fishing as well!
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