Trail shoes | High Sierra Topix  

Trail shoes

Share your advice and personal experiences, post a gear review or ask any questions you may have pertaining to outdoor gear and equipment.
User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby Carne_DelMuerto » Sat May 19, 2012 9:05 am

I have been using Vasque VST's for my day hiking and they are great. They do lack some durability, but I found them online for about $25/pair and so just bought a couple pairs. I used them last year for a 3-night trip in Emigrant and had no issues. In fact, I got them soaking wet every day, but because they are so thin, they dried out every evening without having to put them next to the fire. I had hoped that the good fit would translate over to a pair of Vasque Sundowner boots, but it did not. Plus, like others, I think I've come to the point where I just don't like the boot covering my ankle.

I recently bought a cheap pair of Vasque Juxt low tops and they are my new favorite. They are more durable than the VSTs and have a thicker sidewall, giving the foot more protection from sharp objects. I'll be using those this summer for my 7-day trip out of Pine Creek.

As for hiking poles, I am a recent convert and I absolutely love them. I got a pair intending to use them soley for backpacking. After testing them out on a day hike, I liked them so much that I use them every time I go out. They help me keep a rhythm going, make climbing steeps much easier, and my legs don't feel as tired after a big hike. Add another vote for the Black Diamond carbon poles.
Wonder is rock and water and the life that lives in-between.



User avatar
Carne_DelMuerto
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 296
Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2010 12:43 am
Location: Auburn, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby tightline » Tue May 22, 2012 9:11 am

Yeah, shopping for trekking poles is something having never used them before...everything from $25 to $200 out there. Not being familiar with the different features I'm not sure what will be useful to me, hype or whatever. I guess I'll get some cheaper ones and try them out on some day hikes. We'll see. Thanks again for the input.
User avatar
tightline
Topix Acquainted
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:05 pm
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby Flux » Tue May 22, 2012 11:54 am

I wear the Merrel Perimeters and am dang happy with them. They seem to be in the mid weight boot and have great support and traction. Break in was not that bad. I have sensitive feet that are a bit wide at the metatarsal and bad ankles too. These boots have saved me from a rolled ankle a couple times.

I tried on like 12 pairs of boots, drove the store folks crazy, but kept coming back to these.
User avatar
Flux
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 415
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2010 9:57 am
Location: Palmdale
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby Carne_DelMuerto » Tue May 22, 2012 4:32 pm

tightline wrote:Yeah, shopping for trekking poles is something having never used them before...everything from $25 to $200 out there. Not being familiar with the different features I'm not sure what will be useful to me, hype or whatever. I guess I'll get some cheaper ones and try them out on some day hikes. We'll see. Thanks again for the input.


I briefly saw a pair of carbon trekking poles at Costco for $30. I didn't check them out thoroughly, but for $30 it's almost worth the gamble.
Wonder is rock and water and the life that lives in-between.
User avatar
Carne_DelMuerto
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 296
Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2010 12:43 am
Location: Auburn, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby tightline » Wed May 23, 2012 4:45 pm

There is a pair of what is evidently the lower end black diamond poles at Sierra Trading Post for less than $40--the "syncline" I believe. I do not know if this deal is offered on-line (I was at the store) but you know they do seem to have some very good deals on a lot of stuff on-line if you have not checked them out. Lots of different things like the merino socks, to Asolos and other shoes--some of which I believe have been mentioned on this thread, seem to run cheaper than a lot of other places. REI is also having a big sale now thru the 28th. Anyway, I thought I'd maybe try out the synclines to get used to them. Like I said, I don't know if shock absorbers are worth all the extra $. I guess maybe you could make a point for graphite because of weight--but aluminum is stronger? (In my case they'll have to handle around 250 lbs with the pack on etc.). I guess what I am trying to determine is if there is really THAT big of a difference between one or the other...my main concern by far is decending. Seems like cork handles would be nice too as opposed to rubber but hell I don't know. We'll see. BTW, I found some Brookes Cascadia trail runners on sale for half off and grabbed them.....they're bright red though :)
User avatar
tightline
Topix Acquainted
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:05 pm
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby freestone » Wed May 23, 2012 5:48 pm

MHO, the adjustable shocks are worth the extra price, especially if you are trying to save your knees on the steep downhill stuff. Your wrists will thank you too. My remaining pole (lost the other one) has a Tee shaped cork handle which you don't see too much anymore but I now use it like a cane going downhill, preempting my downhill step with the pole that transfers the weight off my knee and onto the pole. I really suggest you go to somewhere like an REI and talk to someone who is knowledgeable. There is so much to consider in order to make a good match to your hiking style and expectations.
User avatar
freestone
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 571
Joined: Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:42 pm
Location: Santa Barbara
Experience: Level 1 Hiker

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby quentinc » Thu May 24, 2012 6:40 pm

As usual, mileage may vary. I have never found the shock absorbers really absorb any shock. They may, however, induce some sticker shock.
User avatar
quentinc
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 890
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2005 10:28 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby sparky » Thu May 24, 2012 8:35 pm

tightline wrote:Yeah, shopping for trekking poles is something having never used them before...everything from $25 to $200 out there. Not being familiar with the different features I'm not sure what will be useful to me, hype or whatever. I guess I'll get some cheaper ones and try them out on some day hikes. We'll see. Thanks again for the input.



I started bringing a single pole....but I just use the wal mart cheap one. It has been abused quite heavily, and still works fine. I do have rough hands, but the grips are just fine. You can only do so much with technology for a staff. I would never consider a shock absorbing one.
There is a million ways to be human, all are worthwhile.

True happiness is the absence of striving for happiness.
-Chuang Tzu.
User avatar
sparky
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 880
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 10:01 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: Trail shoes

Postby baddog » Sat May 26, 2012 8:16 pm

Skip the trail runners, you can thank me later. Unless you meet my 20/20 rule, trail runners are not for you. It's very simple, two of the following must apply to you: You're in your 20's, you're carrying 20 lbs or less (water excluded), you can do 20 miles a day or average 20 minute miles per hour(pack and water included) in any terrain.

I just switched to Lowa Ronan GTX mid-hikers and it's hard to imagine I will go back. Stability, traction, protection and durability are way beyond anything a plactic trail runner can provide. Not a Goretex fan, but after hiking up the Mist trail and sloshing around in the Merced, it was pretty cool to have dry socks and boots. :) When it comes to what brand, it's what fits you. Lowa fits me perfect, everytime, out of box. The quality is excellent and they have a buzzillion boots to choose from. They classify my boots under the day, short-haul or weekend category. These things are beefy and would standup for months on the trail. You should check out the beasts they reccomend for "backpacking".

Poles are a must and knee savers on the downhill climbs. Mine are old school Leki Makalus. Bulletproof and heavy at 22ozs, but I can swing them all day any my arms are never fatigued. There is a big split between anti-shock and no anti-shock and I am in the no anti-shock camp. I absolutely hate anti-shock. :angry: The springy, vague and uncertain pole plants drive me nuts. :mad: I recently purchased some BD Ultralight Carbon Z-Poles which weigh a scant 9+ ozs, but they felt fragile and would never take the beating my Makalus can; I took them back without a try.
User avatar
baddog
Topix Novice
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:26 am
Experience: N/A

Previous

Return to Outdoor Gear Topix



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests