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Stoves

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Re: Stoves

Postby frediver » Sun Jul 24, 2011 1:08 am

Aluminum roof flashing makes a decent stove wind screen.



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Re: Stoves

Postby 87TT » Sun Jul 24, 2011 8:52 pm

That's what I used and it melted next to the burner. I have a stand up one for the coleman but for the Giga you need one that goes right up to and around the burner. This is so you don't trap heat around the canister. The factory ones are steel for a reason I guess. I have an idea for a hybrid version with a tin center section. The thing worked awsome until the center part around the burner melted and the whole thing started to sag letting the wind in.
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Re: Stoves

Postby frediver » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:45 am

I don't know the output of your stove in BTU but my Primus is very high and I have no problems using flashing. IMO I never enclose my stove 100%, 75% is good enough and has allowed sufficient air flow to prevent overheating the fuel can.
You could always add additional vent holes to the bottom edge if you needed more
ventilation.
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Re: Stoves

Postby 87TT » Mon Jul 25, 2011 9:26 pm

The windscreen I made looks something like the factory one but it melted around the burner.
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Re: Stoves

Postby fishmonger » Tue Jul 26, 2011 10:41 am

I've used so many stoves over the years, I don't really know where to begin. Currently I still own my 1980's Bleuet GAZ stove, but only to one day go back on the Muir Trail in full vintage gear to shock the ultra-lighters :D

I never use white gas or alcohol stoves, only propane/butane, even in winter. Has worked well for me over 25+ years of mountaineering, so I won't change that. The only thing that has changed is the weight and efficiency of the stoves. My current stove/pot selection ranges from a Vargo Titanium mini burner that's about 3 ounces and mates well with a super thin 1.2 liter titanium pot - good for 3-season solo trips, but as of late it has lost out to my new Jetboil Sol - super light, although I have my doubts about reliability with all the plastic on there. Still, more efficient than the Vargo and super light as long as you can live with an 0.8 liter pot for everything.

For group hikes I have a Gigapower stove that sits nice and low to the ground with remote canister, and it can handle a pretty large pot without getting unstable. As of last winter I also have a Jetboil Helios for cold weather and group use - very efficient, but rather bulky with the 2 liter pot. It can also take a 3 liter pot if you're in large groups. Worked very well at -10F on Whitney melting snow this winter. The Helios comes with a nice windscreen that keeps things going pretty well, while for the other setup I need to bring a custom foldable aluminum screen or just use the terrain.

These bigger stove/pot combos do not make any sense in solo outings. The Jetboil Sol or Flash are pretty much the thing to get for efficient and reliable water heating. Everything else that weighs a little less is a much bigger PITA to deal with.

For summer trips I have considered trying one of the very efficient wood burning stoves. Not sure if I want to deal with that (especially after a rainy day), but there are a few ounces of weight savings in the cards if you can wait for the coffee a little longer and carry branches up a mountain pass if you need to cook above 10,000 feet. There are some rather efficient designs out there that work with just a few twigs.
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Re: Stoves

Postby frediver » Tue Jul 26, 2011 11:40 am

A cheap plug for a new wood stove.
Check out Emberlit.
I have no connection except I just bought one.
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Re: Stoves

Postby freestone » Tue Jul 26, 2011 5:53 pm

Make sure you check out the new regulations for fire above 10,000 feet effective last August. My understanding is you can not even carry wood for a wood burning stove to a location above 10K. I bought a wood burning stove last year but have not used it yet because of this new regulation.
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Re: Stoves

Postby funcrew » Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:59 pm

Beverage-can alcohol stove with a wind screen. Very light, quiet, and works great. Have used it down to maybe 25 degrees with no problems.
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Re: Stoves

Postby mp88 » Wed Aug 03, 2011 7:49 am

This is the stove I haved used for two years now, it has NEVER failed me and the whole kit weighs 15oz with 8oz of fuel. I can get 8 pots of boiling water at 16oz of water or simmering water with 20oz of water, a good trick with these stoves is to put your water in the sun before boiling it if possible.

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Re: Stoves

Postby Chris B » Wed Aug 10, 2011 2:15 pm

This is my first post on this forum, I have just signed up after meeting Mark, one of the site Admins on a recent trip to Yosemite. I like the forum, lots of good advice and stoves just happen to be one of my interests. In theory I should be more interested in the important things like Tents and sleeping bags but I'm just not.

I have been backpacking mainly in Europe for more years than I like to remember and have played with virtually every stove going, however I have come down to 3 favorites that I use depending on the trip.

1 MSR SimmerLite, this is my choice for longer trips with a few friends. Kicks out a lot of heat regardless of conditions and is pretty economical on fuel. You can make it simmer with a bit of experience so you can cook rather than boil meals. I pack this in a small pot, either MSR or Snowpeak to protect it in transit

2 Trangia, I think it is the 27 model, the smaller two person kit, they are a bit heavy (2lbs) but thats for pots, pans, kettle and plate. I think they do lighter version know but mine is 25years old. I often use this in the UK where White gas is not readily available. This is slow but dependable and gives of a nice smell. The big plus with these stoves is the fumes are not to dangerous, they are very stable and do not flare up. This means at a push you can cook in your tent, this is important in the UK where it can rain any day of the year.

3 BCP Crusader - This is standard issue for the UK army (and now the US Army) it is basically a kidney shaped cup than fits under a standard NATO water bottle the "stove" is like a metal bowl which you place a solid fuel tablet then stand the cup in. The original UK version have some basic pot stands but the US version is just a bit of bashed out steel that up hang you mug on. The shape of the mugs makes it much better for eating out of than a round one and the handles are long enough to use it on a fire. The US army use a gel fuel but this is messy, best to use Esbit tablets from REI, one will boil a couple of mugs of water. This is my personal choice for solo trips living on mountain house meals. Stove and mug weigh about 5oz and a weeks worth of fuel about 4oz so very light.

http://www.adventurebikerider.com/compo ... ystem.html

There are always canister stoves but they are just to simple to be of interest, however I must admit I have a pocket rocket for those trips where you just need a quick meal before hitting the sack.
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Re: Stoves

Postby markskor » Wed Aug 10, 2011 2:34 pm

Chris,
Glad you found us here at HST. Welcome aboard!
BTW, Yosemite was a blast...If memory serves, (often doubtful), spent an evening with Chris in the BP camp - good company too.
Mark
Mountainman who swims with trout
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Re: Stoves

Postby gochicagobears! » Sat Aug 13, 2011 12:21 am

Currently I use a Snow Peak Giga with the pietzo. I love this stove's compactness and ease of use. However, I did notice last year at Young Lakes in Yosemite that the ignite failed. This was the only time and it hasn't since that time, which perhaps was due to the elevation being something like 9,100' or so... Otherwise, it's been remarkablely reliable.
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