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Zip stove?

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Zip stove?

Postby BSquared » Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:01 pm

I've got a friend who has a Zip wood-burning stove, and he's a little concerned about taking it into parts of the Sierra (he's only used it in Utah and out here in the east). The Zip website has the following FAQ:

Is the stove allowed by the U.S. Forest Service and National Parks?

Both of these organizations consider the Sierra Stove a contained fire and it is allowed anywhere other backpacking stoves are allowed. However, due to local fire conditions some forest rangers may override this decision and not allow any type of "wood burning" stove.


Anybody on this forum ever heard comments, one way or t'other, about using such a stove in high-fire-danger times and areas?

-B2



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Re: Zip stove?

Postby markskor » Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:36 pm

While waiting on a wilderness permit in Tuolumne, another party ahead of me asked a similar question about these type stoves.
The consensus there among the YNP rangers seemed to be no...not considered a stove but considered burning wood, and as such subject to the same 9,600 ft fire regs.
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Re: Zip stove?

Postby sierranomad » Sun Jan 04, 2009 10:25 pm

While not directly answering the question...

I used a zip stove for years; and at the time I swore by it.

That said, I was pretty uncomfortable with it whenever in a high fire danger area. The Zip Stove doesn't have a spark arestor, so there's always the possibility of sparks flying (especially when there's wind). I used to live in the east, and most of my hiking was in areas that had recently been soaked with rain so it wasn't much of a concern. But not too long after moving back here I stopped using it.
Jon

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Re: Zip stove?

Postby hikerduane » Mon Jan 05, 2009 3:24 am

A lot of places don't allow fires and gathering of wood. Also, I think the line is drawn at something that can be shut off by turning a valve etc. to shut it down, a woodstove would not fall into that category. The Pepsi can stoves too I believe.
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Re: Zip stove?

Postby BSquared » Tue Jan 06, 2009 3:42 pm

sierranomad wrote:I used to live in the east, and most of my hiking was in areas that had recently been soaked with rain so it wasn't much of a concern.


:p I love it! Yes, most of my hiking, especially last summer, was in areas that were being soaked with rain while I was hiking. Frankly, I'm tired of it!

-B2
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Re: Zip stove?

Postby gdurkee » Tue Jan 06, 2009 4:27 pm

B2 et al:

That's one of those Talmudic questions we (individual rangers & agencies) seem to answer differently. I don't know of any of the b/c rangers in Sequoia Kings, anyway, ever telling someone they couldn't use their zip stove in a 'no fire' area. They burn small twigs etc and don't seem to have much impact -- either in fuel used or ash. I'm also not too concerned about fire danger at alpine elevations (and assuming careful use). Still, there's a potential danger there as well as running into a not-hugely-sympathetic ranger (none exist that I know of, but I'm just sayin'....).

Which is all to say if you show you're being careful and even show you brought the actual fuel/twigs from a lower elevation, I don't think you'd run into a problem. (Famous last words. Be sure to yell "George said it was ok" when the angry bug-eyed ranger crashes into your camp at midnight).

George "come and get me, coppers" D.
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