Alcohol Stoves

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frediver
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by frediver » Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:44 am

I was thinking of just using the bottle the HEET came in for storage, I would expect that to be leak-proof ?
What is the consensus concerning HEET Vs. Alcohol ?








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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by hikin_jim » Mon Sep 12, 2011 1:02 pm

frediver wrote:I was thinking of just using the bottle the HEET came in for storage, I would expect that to be leak-proof ?
What is the consensus concerning HEET Vs. Alcohol ?
HEET (in the yellow bottle) is alcohol, methyl alcohol, aka methanol. It works pretty well, and is actually supposed to work better in cold weather than the "other" stove alcohol, ethyl alcohol, aka ethanol (the kind of alcohol people drink when it is food grade). The HEET that isn't so great is HEET in the red bottle. HEET in the red bottle is isopropyl alcohol (ispropanol). HEET in the red bottle is a big, smoky mess. Not good.

I've got a lot of information on alcohol as a stove fuel on my blog if you're interested.

There shouldn't be any problem with keeping HEET in the yellow bottle, and some people really like the HEET bottle because its long neck makes pouring easier. "Flip top" bottles seem to be the bottle of choice with alcohol for a lot of folks. I've had very good luck with my "flip top" bottles.

HJ
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by hikin_jim » Mon Sep 12, 2011 1:07 pm

AlmostThere wrote:use a stove with a wick to address decreased performance in cold - you can make a Supercat or any other stove a wick stove by epoxy-ing a few wraps of wicking around the circumference of it.
Interesting. Makes sense.

Trangia sells a little "winter kit" with their burners. You basically have a little pan you put under the stove. You pour alcohol in the pan and light it on fire. The "priming" alcohol gets the alcohol in the burner warm enough that the burner works properly.

HJ
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frediver
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by frediver » Mon Sep 12, 2011 1:12 pm

Good to know, thanks.
What type of "flip" bottle are you using, the measure bottle with "flipper"
I got with my stove leak's, are you removing the "flipper" between uses?

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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by markskor » Mon Sep 12, 2011 5:50 pm

Been looking into Pepsi type alcohol stoves for a while.
Here is the question: If one were to go out for 10+ days at a time, go high, 10,000+, cook fish, some pasta dishes (maybe 20 minutes stove-time each night - mostly simmer) and usually a coffee boil mornings...

How much fuel would you need to haul as compared with my canister WindPro? Usually on a 10-day trip carrying two 460 isobutane canisters, (usually one 1/2 full - <1 pound) and stove (7.6 oz) = ~1 1/4 pounds for stove and gas. What would, on a same comparable trip, a 10-day alcohol stove, fuel bottle, and needed fuel weigh?
Thanks,
Mark
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freestone
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by freestone » Mon Sep 12, 2011 8:25 pm

Markskor, without getting into the minutia of details, the message I get from the tests is that the longer the trip, the more efficient the cannister style stove is when compared to a alcohol burner, especially if you are cooking and simmering pasta dishes. In order for you to approach that efficiency with alcohol, you would have to make big changes in what and how you cook. I use an alcohol stove but my trips are under 5 days and the meals are based on boiled water (2 cups H2O, 30cc alcohol) poured on the food, then placed in a cozy. I boil on average 6 cups a day and use 100cc to do it. 1000cc (one liter) will get me 10 days, 1 liter of denatured alcohol weighs about 3.7 kilos. My old hippie memory says 2.2 kilos=1pound. :cool:
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by freestone » Mon Sep 12, 2011 8:28 pm

Very cool Vandman. What is the red thingy in your last image that the pot seems to be setting on?
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by Carne_DelMuerto » Mon Sep 12, 2011 8:33 pm

freestone wrote:Very cool Vandman. What is the red thingy in your last image that the pot seems to be setting on?
Freestone, I believe that is the flame. :rolleyes: :D
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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by AlmostThere » Mon Sep 12, 2011 8:56 pm

The amount of fuel depends on a number of things - what stove you use, how much water, what kind of cooking, and whether you want boiling water or if just-warm-enough water will work for you. I can get away with an ounce a day with the right stove and the right menu.
Last edited by AlmostThere on Mon Sep 12, 2011 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Alcohol Stoves

Post by markskor » Mon Sep 12, 2011 9:09 pm

freestone wrote: 1000cc (one liter) will get me 10 days, 1 liter of denatured alcohol weighs about 3.7 kilos. My old hippie memory says 2.2 kilos=1pound. :cool:
Freestone,
Perhaps you suffer from old hippie syndrome...(BTW, me too.) but believe your math a bit skewed.

Without sounding like an anti-intellect, (whatever that means but like it - thanks Mr. Carter), 1000 grams of water - (slightly heavier than alcohol but close) weighs 1000 grams...
= 1000cc = 1000 ml = 1 liter.
454 grams to the pound (remembered from old hippie days - the chronic ) means 1 liter (1000ml) weighs 2.2 pounds. Add in the weight of the alcohol stove and fuel bottle and you are probably right in that a canister stove would indeed be slightly more efficient for longer type trips.
Peace!
Mark
Mountainman who swims with trout

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