If you snowcamp, what tent do you use? | High Sierra Topix  

If you snowcamp, what tent do you use?

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Postby SteveM » Tue Jan 17, 2006 7:16 am

HikerDuane
The Nallo 2 takes 9 stakes to hold it down. Three on the foot end. Two on the vestibule (or 4 if you want to stake the door down). And two on each side. The loops on the foot end have string to tie to or directly to loops on the tent itself. By tieing to the strings, you get lift at the bottom which allows more ventilation however, when it's snowing, you have to peg it to the ground, thus less "flow thru" ventilation.

As far as getting it set up, it's a two piece tent. The inside section is held to the outside via short straps and a form of button that fits thru a loop on the outer tent. There's probably about eight of these loops on each side (top/bottom). If the wind is blowing, the tent tends to wrap a little and can create a little confusion determining which end is up.

The worst part was, the ground was as hard as a rock. So, the more stakes you have to deal with the harder it was to set up.

Don't get me wrong. I like the tent. I just prefer to deal with as few stakes as possible when snow camping. Either the ground is hard or there's several feet of snow and the snow anchors freeze into the ground and they're a pain to get out in one piece. I realize that snow camping in itself is a challenge and maybe...... that's just something that I can't get around having to deal with, but I'd like to get more opinions (and more chances) to try out as many free-standing 4 season tents that I can before I buy.

If it works out that they all have condensation problems (as it's starting to appear), I might make the Nallo 2 my choice of winter tents. Everything else about it is great. But, there are a few others I'd like to check into before making that choice.
Image

Good luck on your quest
Steve



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Postby hikerduane » Tue Jan 17, 2006 7:10 pm

My old Eureka summer, A-frame tent was a pain to set up in good weather. Free standing tents are a little easier to set up I guess. I was thinking that is quite a few stakes for the Nallow 2, but my SD tent takes 8 stakes if the fly is used. I didn't have any trouble setting it up at Lake Winnemucca. To properly set my tent up in the winter, on snow, I should get an ice axe. I can't do a good job of anchoring my tent unless I can dig down further then my boots can kick out and then there is the problem of unearthing them in the morning. I've gotten by with sticks when needed, but at Lake Winnemucca, I should have buried my stakes instead of using sticks, which only one small one broke.

Nice photo, thanks for the info and chat.
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Postby SteveM » Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:01 pm

HikerDuane,

You might look at the Hilleberg Jannu. Slightly heavier than your 5 lb limit, but not by much. Two piece tent, tied together and freestanding...

http://www.hilleberg.com/Catalog/jannu_4053774.htm

Also, a little article from Hilleberg about condensation.
http://www.hilleberg.com/Condensation.htm

Take care,
Steve
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Postby nazdarovye » Tue Jan 17, 2006 9:52 pm

Duane -

I'll bring the Hilleberg Saivo on one of our NorCal Hikers snow trips this spring, and you can check it out. The Jannu is basically a scaled-down variant on it, with one vestibule instead of two.

- Steve
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Postby hikerduane » Wed Jan 18, 2006 7:03 pm

Thanks Steve. I checked out a SD tent last weekend. Expanded my search a little.
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Postby norcalhiker » Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:03 am

I use my Bibler Tempest and I like it. I've also used: Trangos, MSR ones, Sierra Designs and Megamids. I like mine the best.
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Postby hikerduane » Sun Feb 05, 2006 5:59 pm

I kinda have my sights set on a SD Solomente. Just over 3 lbs., with a vestibule, free standing, $329. Last years model was the Solomente AST. If my 3 season tent can take high winds, something made for 4 seasons should be great. I still have a little time to think this out somemore. I'm going thru my local, small town dealer to buy it if they can order one at the upcoming show later in Feb. My old SD Halfmoon is still going strong and SD replaced my fly some years back when the old fly started leaking a little. All I wanted was to have the old fly recoated but I got a brand new one with nary a word on my part. When the group I bp with, goes snowshoeing, they put some miles in on a snowshoe trip. We went up into Lassen Park last winter and snowshoed around 4 miles, 2 by how the crow flies according to their GPS's. Then there was Lake Winnemucca in Dec. thru the 2 feet of fresh snow coming out.

Thanks
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Postby hikerduane » Mon Apr 02, 2007 6:19 pm

I picked up a Black Diamond Hilight, weight 2 lbs., 10 oz., using my small REI dividend and the 20% off one item special, plus had it shipped to the Reno REI to save shipping since I am thru Reno every week anyway and it can't be sold in CA. I had it set up in my living room for a whole day, while trying to decide if I wanted to keep it. I had a long review typed last night but I lost my connection and didn't copy my page, so I'll write a short version tonight. First, it isn't fun or quick to set up, at least for the first time. I thought it would be nice having to crawl inside, where you could get out of any rain or snow to insert the poles in snaps at the corners but you need a good grip to put the other end of the pole in the other snap as they call it. I can't see women having an easy time of this. When the three poles are in place they form a small area on the roof whick looks like it will pool water up. Onward. Seam sealing. What. A. Job. I spent 4 hours I bet sealing all the exterior seams and putting a grid on the floor.

The Hilight is a little heavier than the OneShot which I would have liked to have had, but the OneShot was a little too short and narrow at 36" high and 36" wide I believe. I have been in short narrow shelters before and they are not fun when wet or have condensation on the inside. I would really have liked to have purchased a high end 4 season tent but I have only had the need for one once in all the time I have been snow camping. Up to the last couple winters, I always went by myself. The Hilight will be used during the shoulder seasons and during good weather in the winter. It should stand up to heavy snowfall and high winds as one of our group on a trip over a year ago in Dec. had a BD Firstlight I believe it was and it did great in a 2' snowfall over night and very high winds. I'm sure with the high winds the snow couldn't accumulate on its roof.
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Postby Wanderer » Mon Apr 09, 2007 8:48 pm

Hi Duane, don't know if you noticed since we were camped off to the side aways, but Songbyrd & I both had Bibler I tents set up. I didn't have a vestibule with me on the New Years trip, but have since added one. I've now had my Bibler 4 or 5 years - still one of my favorite pieces of gear. If you're still considering it as a 4 season bomb-proof tent, it gets my vote!
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Postby hikerduane » Tue Apr 10, 2007 5:55 am

I didn't go over and look at them, but now that you mention it you did have the Bibler tents.

I am really disappointed with my BD Hilight now. I took the thing down and weighed it over the weekend which I should have done before I set it up and seam sealed it then powdered the floor grid I put on. It weights 3lbs. 8.5 ozs. now. Not happy for what I thought would be a great tent for cooler weather light rain if any, light weight.
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Postby StumbleBum » Wed Apr 11, 2007 2:15 pm

Integral Designs MK 3. Similar in design to a Bibler.
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Postby hikerduane » Wed Apr 11, 2007 4:48 pm

StumbleBum, as most that were listed in earlier posts, they are a little bit more than I want to spend. Thank you for your choice. I would lean that way, I noticed my earlier leanings toward the SD Solomente have changed and it is no longer offered I see. I told the small engine shop yesterday where I picked up a part for my wood splitter, that I should have gotten a newer chain saw and made a little money selling firewood then picked up a tent and by then maybe something else would have come along. Like I thought the BD Hilight was it. :crybaby:
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