Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

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AlmostThere
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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by AlmostThere » Tue May 22, 2018 10:10 am

thegib wrote:"If it's possible to be comfortable on a thin ensolite pad I'd really like to know how to do it."

It's called hydrocodone.
I slept on a Z Lite comfortably, but it has to be in my hammock.

Never going to bother with it on the ground unless all the trees are falling and there are no rocks with cracks in them from which to chock a strap and hang the hammock.

I do not agree that it's impractical to hammock in the Sierra, because my mileage varies, a whole lot, in the other direction.








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longri
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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by longri » Tue May 22, 2018 11:24 am

thegib wrote:"If it's possible to be comfortable on a thin ensolite pad I'd really like to know how to do it."

It's called hydrocodone.
Cute.

One natural remedy that I've found to be quite effective for a thin pad on a hard, bumpy, cramped surface is complete exhaustion. When tired enough a bed of nails is comfortable.

I think carrying a comfortable pad is a lot more practical. My inflatable pad rolls up so small that it just about disappears into my pack. I worry about forgetting it.

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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by mrphil » Tue May 22, 2018 11:42 am

Of all the gear I own, sleeping pads have always given me the most grief. Probably the single most thought out and experimented with item in my entire pack. I hate it! I've got a full range of Therm-a-Rest NeoAirs, a Synmat, and a couple older Pacific Outdoors self-inflating pads with side rails. For a lot of reasons, I always seem to go back to the Pacific Outdoors pads, even though they're so patched by now that they look like quilts (a few breaths of air to top it off vs 20 to make it do something other than lay there in a flat heap). You have to compromise in weight, packability, size, comfort, R-value, durability, sometimes crazy prices... then make a decision on what you're willing to give up in order to gain somewhere else.

That said, Nemo and Sea to Summit are putting out some good pads these days, but with some drawbacks. When you think about it, is that really any different than anybody else's? It's always so subjective and personal, but my next pad is going to be the REI Air-Rail. Its heavier and doesn't pack as small, but it's self-inflating, 23" wide, 1.5" thick, has an R-value of 4.2, and it's cheap by comparison. To save a couple ounces and for more insulation/padding at the hips, I may end up buying the women's version. Right now, it's on sale for less than $70, so when you ask yourself how wrong you can be for that amount, it's a whole lot less than you could just as easily be for $200 if it's not the pad that gives you what you want and need.

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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by BillyBobBurro » Thu May 24, 2018 10:59 am

Several years ago I switched over to using a two pad combo solution that is comprised of a full sized closed cell foam mat and then a kids REI inflatable. You can use the foam mat around camp and not worry about campfire sparks or pine needles popping it. The kids inflatable is not that much added weight.

I am a side sleeper and by day 3 or 4 my hips would be getting pretty sore with a single foam mat. Now I am floating in bliss!

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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by markskor » Thu May 24, 2018 11:37 am

Same as above - a two pad system.
ProLite-Plus short (47" - 14 oz - R - 3.4 - 1 1/2 inches thick)...shoulders to knees... and
A slightly cut-down, blue, cc pad (~ 4 feet) for under feet and around camp.

The pads are carried external - the Thermarest rolled up tight inside the cc pad...protected.
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Satchel Buddah
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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by Satchel Buddah » Tue May 29, 2018 7:42 am

I am a belly-side sleeper. I sleep with a quilt and a normal size neoair xlite- Happy and comfy. Have played with the zlite which is great to dump as is on any ground without worrying about damage or dirt, but not so comfy on hips and with a much smaller r value. Gotta love the foot massage with the zlite tho, just standing on it with naked feet at the end of the day is bliss. :)
In the quest for smaller-lighter, I am tempted by a short neoair, with maybe a few zlite sections which might bring a nice mix of utility. But I am not sure of what the proper “technique’ is with a short pad for belly/side sleepers- are you resting your head outside of the pad on a “pillow”? Would that make your arms dangle out on the floor? Are you using your backpack as insulation for legs or head? (I see most of you seem to pack some blue foam insulator) Could that setup work with a quilt (it’s a EE revelation, closed foot box)?

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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by markskor » Tue May 29, 2018 9:00 am

Also belly/side sleeper. Use a Mont-bell blow-up pillow (3 oz)
https://www.montbell.us/products/disp.php?p_id=1124671
usually partially deflated and wrapped by a down layer...pretty plush actually.

BTW, this pillow also serves double-duty - as my ersatz PFD when out rafting.
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freestone
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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by freestone » Tue May 29, 2018 9:59 am

A 2 pad system for me now. The BA AXL uninsulated air pad with a small Z lite pad on top for some R value. The Z has a multitude of additional uses that includes but not limited to lounging and napping around camp or on the trail. Not much weight penalty with the air pad and if it fails, the Z is the backup. Some good dependable insulation from the ground is very important for me and my well being on the trail and the Z lite delivers on that.
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Satchel Buddah
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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by Satchel Buddah » Tue May 29, 2018 11:34 am

aye, I tried a number of "backpacking pillows" through the years and did not find one that worked for me - inflatables end up either neckbreakers or slide and squirt when underinflated :) Lately I have been happy with a tiny cotton pillowcase with my down puffy in it, probably under 20 grams and tiny pack size. Clothes bag used to be pretty good when I was overpacking a bit but nowadays has dwindled to pretty much nothing at night...

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Re: Lightweight comfortable sleeping pad?

Post by freestone » Tue May 29, 2018 12:20 pm

Satchel Buddah wrote:aye, I tried a number of "backpacking pillows" through the years and did not find one that worked for me - inflatables end up either neckbreakers or slide and squirt when underinflated :)
I've had good luck with covering the head end of the air pad with a tee-shirt then place the inflatable pillow inside the tee so that the t-shirt holds it in place. I roll side to side all night long and the pillow stays in place nicely, wedged by the tee to the pad.
“Short cuts make long delays.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

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