Summer sleeping bag weight?

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JenniferRP
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Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by JenniferRP » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:09 am

Sorry to be that person who shows up right away with a question.

I'm going on a multi-day horseback riding trip with my husband with an outfitter. The outfitter is providing tents, but not bags or pads. We only have one bag and it is ancient. We have a total dunnage limit of 30 lbs for everything we're taking with us other than the clothes on our back and our rain coats, so need lightweight bags (and advice on pads or what we should do there).

The trip is at the end of July and we will be at altitude (I'm told over 10,000 feet), but there will be two of us in a suitable tent. I'm seeing recommendations of anywhere from 20 to 40 degrees for bag rating, which is not really helpful.

We both tend to sleep a little warm.

I don't want to cheap out, but I'm also not up for paying hundreds of dollars for pro level gear given we camp very rarely. I do plan on taking good quality long underwear.








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oldranger
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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by oldranger » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:41 am

20 degree bag. Go to REI and compare bags and pads. 30lbs is generous if it does not include food, tent, cooking gear. On such a trip you can go with a heavier bag say up to 4 lbs and a really cushy pad for the same weight. Can't imagine that personal gear should add up to 22 lbs per person. Also if you are not used to riding suggest you go on a couple of 2 hour rides at a local stables if possible. Multiple days on horseback can be tougher than you think. You will have to pay hundreds for quality gear. You will be paying thousands for a multiday all expenses trip so don't short yourself on sleeping comfort!
Mike

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maverick
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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by maverick » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:30 pm

Hi Jennifer,

Welcome to HST!
Since you mentioned you don't plan on going out often, maybe consider renting from REI or https://www.lowergear.com/product.php/cat/3
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AlmostThere
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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by AlmostThere » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:00 pm

Some REI stores no longer rent bags or pads. But there are places online that do. Borrowing is also a good option. Pads with at least an R value of 3 and bags at least 20-30F would be sufficient. A layered clothing approach lets you add a layer to stay warm at night if you have to.

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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by Wandering Daisy » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:55 pm

REI is pretty expensive compared to other outdoor stores, if you are not concerned about weight. Sportsman Warehouse or Sports Chalet both have good quality bags. I would avoid buying a bag on the internet, because I think it is important for people who have not spent many nights in a sleeping bag to actually get in it and try it out. This also means sleeping in it one night at home (inside so you do not get it dirty) and returning the bag if it is not comfortable. A rectangular bag will be more roomy, but can be colder due to the drafts caused by all that space. I would first try a mummy bag and see if you like that. Most cheaper bags will not have draft collars, which are tubes of insulation that go around your shoulders and neck. In that case, just wrap a down coat around your neck if it gets cold. The cheaper bags are made of synthetic insulation. Down is more expensive. Nothing wrong with synthetic insulation if bulk and weight are not an issue. But synthetics do not enclose your body as closely as down, so tend to get drafty if they are too big or wide for you. Kelty and Slumberjack make inexpensive synthetic bags that are fair quality. There are plenty of sales so no need to buy one at full price. Temperature ratings on the cheaper bags are not always very accurate. You can always unzip the bag if too warm so I agree that a 20-degree bag is the best bet. I doubt you will get below freezing temperatures at 10,000 feet but better to be safe.

As for sleeping pads, be aware that an air mattress does not necessarily provide insulation. If you choose an air mattress, you could buy those blue foam pads at Wamart to put under the air mattress. Thremarest actually has some good car-camping sleeping pads that are in the $50 range, if you want to spend that much.

Most of the cheaper options for bags and mattresses, will be quite bulky. Do you also have a limit on bulk, as well as weight?

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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by Dave_Ayers » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:18 pm

You don't show a location. If you are near the SF Bay Area, Sports Basement rents equipment. See https://shop.sportsbasement.com/search? ... %20Rentals . Also there is http://www.outbackadventures.com/rentals/camping.htm in Fremont.

I'd opt for some variety of air mattress or air-filled pad for comfort, especially if you sleep on your sides. Hip digging into hard ground is no fun.

For warmth, many folks do choose thermals. But remember, heat rises. For maximum warmth, reduce worn clothing and spread it on top of the bag (or body) instead.

If you like to stretch out, you may find a mummy style bag restrictive enough to prevent good sleep. Consider whether you'll be better off with a rectangular bag.

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JenniferRP
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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by JenniferRP » Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:30 am

In NoVA. City folk, so no vehicle, which means the only places I can get to are REI or a place with extremely limited options. REI is definitely my best bet. Renting is not going to really be feasible unless there's some place somebody knows of that is near Mammoth Lake? (Our full trip is almost three weeks and that's a long time to rent something). I'd be quite happy with renting if we can find a place.

No stated limit on bulk, but it's going to have to go on a mule, so I want to keep it down if possible. Don't want to make life harder for the wranglers.

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JenniferRP
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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by JenniferRP » Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:36 am

Never mind. We're going to practically drive by the Sports Basement in San Jose. Thanks for that one! I'm talking to my husband now about reserving rental bags and pads from them.

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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by oldranger » Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:48 am

Jennifer,

As a person with considerable ammount of horse packing experience I cannot overemphasize the importance of maximizing your sleeping comfort, especially on a three week trip. When using stock I used to put a 2 inch self inflating 25 inch wide mattress on top of 1/2 inch closed cell mattress and then use 2 bags zipped together that matched with one on the bottom and one on top. it was like sleeping on a comfortable bed with a down comforter. If I could afford a three week all expense trip, I would now take at least a 3 inch thick, 25 inch or wider self inflating pad with a good tough cover, and a wide 20 degree or better down bag that zips around the foot so you could use it as a quilt. I would also consider making or purchasing some sort of mattress cover so that you will not be laying against the non breathable fabric of the mattress if you are using your bag as a quilt. Horse camping is not the same as backpacking and it is your opportunity to be really comfortable in the backcountry. It is not clear to me that you can rent equipment that meets these criteria and it looks to me that the rental costs for the period that you need it will be about 1/4 to 1/3 of the cost of purchasing, and at the end you have nothing to use for your next trip. Of course if you are not comfortable there is not likely to be a next trip.
Mike

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JenniferRP
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Re: Summer sleeping bag weight?

Post by JenniferRP » Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:32 am

I've done these trips before. I'm not clueless about horseback trips - just about the particular geography ;). The pack trip itself is 6 days, we also have a road trip and some other stuff we're doing, so if we'd rented gear *here* we would be, yes, paying that much, but by renting it in CA we can drop the duration. Last time we did this we rented bags from the outfitter, but the one we're using this time doesn't rent bags. (IOW, this IS the next trip).

I'm not offended. I'm sure you get a lot of people who really do have no idea what they're getting into on these forums, just staving off any more tips on the assumption my riding experience is a one hour trail ride fifteen years ago ;). I've seen those people after five hours in the saddle...

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