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Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 8:31 am
by austex
This post smells like a bloggers excuse to plug some gear. Like said a catalyst is a pack not a bear can...Maybe a proper intro for the first post w/b a more polite entry...

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 8:39 am
by AlmostThere
What it is, is spam. I've seen the exact same post in other forums. I don't think he's associated with ULA, they don't spam people - I am a customer of theirs - but he's got some agenda posting on loosely related threads the exact same post with the same wording.

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:03 am
by markskor
Just wondering why he actively touts a 75-liter backpack...
55 pounds all up?

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:56 am
by longri
It was obviously some sort of troll. I took the bait knowingly. I don't care that I was trolled.

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:04 pm
by Satchel Buddah
After using a loaned Bearikade scout on my HST hike, I am ready to upgrade my BV.
Now the question of size...
I can get about 8 days of food in a scout... But should I go for a weekender instead and get a little headroom for longer hikes, or to contain other bits that are floating in the backpack...
mmmm
Any words of wisdom ? :)

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:17 pm
by Wandering Daisy
I love my Weekender. I like to be able to fit food for a 10-day trip. Have to be quite careful what I bring and pack it precisely. I find that the extra capacity is not a problem, because when I am doing a 4-5 day trip, I then put cook gear, stove and fuel can inside too. There is an old joke; "how much closet space to you need?" "Does not matter; whatever it is you will fill it up!" I am careful not to fill it up with more weighty stuff- but it is nice not have to be so careful about packing it. The only time I wish I had a smaller bear can is for weekend trips.

The deciding factor may be your pack. If you decide on a Weekender, be sure it fits inside your pack the way you want. I definitely want my bear can to ride horizontally, at the top of the pack. A lot of women's small or medium sized packs do not work, so I am restricted to the pack I can use.

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 7:06 pm
by tomba
I have managed to fit food for:
  • Bare Boxer Contender (275 cu. in.) - 4 day trips
  • Bearikade Scout (500 cu. in.) - 9 day trips, or 4 day trips for 3 people
  • Bearikade Expedition (900 cu. in.) - 16 day trips
I pack various nuts, seeds, bits of chocolate, etc. in ziplock bags packed tightly in the can. On longer trips, also olive oil and avocado oil. Maximizing calories (fat) and minimizing weight and volume.

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:13 am
by fishmonger
To me, asking 16 days of food into my Expedition is purely academic. It is great that it can hold calories for that long, but I just don't see any type of Sierra trip that doesn't have the opportunity to resupply sooner and trade that gained space for food that is less dense, but more desirable on a long term basis.

With my usual hiking diet, I can't easily fit more than 10 days of food into the Expedition. There is a point where I draw the line between food and pure survival calorie math. I like to eat well and with a certain variety. Nothing extravagant, but at least something that I enjoy while I am supposed to have a good time in the mountains. Even though I care about keeping things somewhat dense, I do not pick food just based on what packs well, which is the main reason why I have that large canister. I eat warm meals, drink Via coffee packed with mostly air in each pouch, and then the crisp bread doesn't really make great use of the room in the can either, but it's light and keeps the weight of that monster can reasonable. 16 days of solid calories per day are heavy, no matter how you make it fit in there.

I once did the math how many calories you can pack in that can if you just brought olive oil. Something like 90,000 calories was the answer, or a month of 3000 calories per day :) Obviously, you'll soon wish you'd packed that crisp bread with that olive oil...

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:51 am
by Wandering Daisy
Bearikade Weekender has 650 cu in. A bear can basically full of GORP, is not my idea of a backpacking diet! But whatever works, if that is your style. I think that post was trying to point out that you COULD get that much in a bear can, not that it is a diet choice for every trip. It also points out that bear can capacity is better utilized if you re-pack all food in zip locks, loosely. If you cram the food full in the bag, it becomes rigid and does not pack as well.

There are other "bear can" strategies; such as planning the first few nights at locations that have bear boxes, or the first few nights at locations where a supplemental Ursack is legal. Another well known tactic, used by PCT hikers, is to utilize "hiker boxes" and left over food in bear boxes, or even ask for food from JMT hikers, who always carry too much! Perfecting the "sad adorable puppy" look helps in this endeavor. And remember, your first day's food does not have to fit in the can, as long as you consume it all before nightfall. The last day's food does not contain dinner; I usually eliminate trail food the last day and simply do a good breakfast.

I have done 14-day trips before (longest actually was 18 days) where intermediate resupply was awkward or impossible. Frankly, those first few days are downright painful. At some point, however, the extra weight simply slows you down too much, but I would not go as far as to say you never need to do a 14-day trip in the Sierra without resupplying along the way. If thru-hiking a 14-day ration will slow you too much; if stopping to fish or climb or day-hike along the way, then a 14-day trip is quite reasonable.

Re: Bear Canister capacity

Posted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 2:25 pm
by bobby49
Wandering Daisy wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:51 am
Another well known tactic, used by PCT hikers, is to utilize "hiker boxes" and left over food in bear boxes, or even ask for food from JMT hikers, who always carry too much! Perfecting the "sad adorable puppy" look helps in this endeavor.
I was doing the North Lake to South Lake loop, and as I was heading southbound over Muir Pass, there was one fellow sitting there looking sad. I paused briefly to drink a slug of Gatorade and then I asked him how it was going. He said that he had left Onion Valley with a full bear canister of food, and he had a butane stove with one 8-oz butane canister. He was headed for MTR, so he should have been in good shape. Unfortunately, something happened to the butane, and apparently it all leaked out overnight. So, here he was with plenty of food, but with no way to cook it. Then he asked me if I had any food to spare that did not require cooking. He needed just enough to get to MTR, which might mean one more night out. I opened up my bear canister and dug out about 24 ounces worth of sports bars and let him pick which ones he liked. So, he took them all. That was OK by me. It lightened up my pack. I was already making quick progress on my route, so I did not need any extra days worth of food.

However, kids, you can't count on finding a food handout when you might need it.