Emergency kit for day hikes

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gdurkee
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by gdurkee » Sat Jul 08, 2017 4:40 pm

Both the SPOT and InReach are, of course, looking for a satellite signal so the more stuff in the way (trees, rain, cliffs, tent) the poorer the fix. To complicate things, they work on two kinda different satellite systems. I may have it mixed up but I think SPOT is low earth orbit and InReach higher (InReach uses the Iridium sat system, SPOT is GEOS (???)). Still, if you you have a gizmo (phone or dedicated GPS) that gives fix, then either has a fair chance of also working. Also, to text with SPOT it's just bluetooth, so you don't actually need a cell connection. The app makes the phone a keyboard for outbound messages. InReach has a similar ability to pair on some of its models.

All that said, the better the horizon, the higher the chance of a fix. I was following a friend with a ping every 15 minutes. Her signal disappeared for about an hour+ going down the South Fork of the Kings from the JMT crossing and emerging once again when she neared the pass above Lake Basin (memory has taken a teensy nap -- can't remember the pass!).








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rlown
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by rlown » Sat Jul 08, 2017 4:49 pm

Interesting.. My Garmin 12xl that I used on the boat was under a 5/8" piece of marine plywood (roof) and surrounded by the aluminum supports. Always linked up fine. I can't see how a tent would get in the way of syncing up given the frequencies. Guess If I need help, I could stand out in the storm and wait until the SPOT light goes green. Sounds cold though.

For fun: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridium_s ... stellation
and: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globalstar

And the most important part of an emergency kit (to me) is having a friend along, within site on my little day hikes.

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Harlen
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by Harlen » Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:23 pm

"And the most important part of an emergency kit (to me) is having a friend along, within site on my little day hikes."

I feel the same way exactly Russ. And make sure his pack is full of medicinal brandy- Grand Marnier works best on me.
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rlown
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by rlown » Sun Jul 16, 2017 4:30 pm

Have you taught Bear CPR yet? :D

Bubba jumped on my chest a few times and it either meant "I need to pee, dad" or "quit snoring."

I know CPR and basic first aid, and at least 1 in my usual party does. That's an important part of the puzzle, if in a group. As we fish, we generally can see each other during the time around the lake.

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SNOOOOW
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by SNOOOOW » Tue Jul 18, 2017 1:04 pm

PS: I'm not sure I would close a wound in the field under non-sterile conditions. The risk of infection in a closed wound would increase the danger of a worse outcome. I would think an open and draining wound is preferable though might later require cosmetic surgery if a scar is a concern. An ER won't suture a wound after about 8 hours, thus there's usually no point in sending someone out with a significant laceration since it'll take that long to get out, usually. (Well, not quite true since it can be cleaned professionally, just not sutured).[/quote]

A rinse of a wound with clean stream or lake water would suffice prior to a minor suture job in the wild, especially if the wound is not serious. And if you're a little weary of the water source you can filter the water, then rinse the wound then suture. I have seen a suture job done in the backcountry as well as a glue job that resulted in no issues and allowed us to continue our trips.
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gdurkee
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by gdurkee » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:53 pm

True that both glue and sutures do work. That said, a few years ago University Medical Center (Fresno and the medical supervision for EMT's and Parkmedics in Sequoia Kings) told us to not even use butterfly's anymore. And Ah Ha! Serendipity at work! Moments ago, a friend of mine -- retired Director of ER at UC Davis, came by. He said that, at most and only with a wide (spread) wound, that he'd irrigate thoroughly, with iodine in the water, then use steri-strips to bring the wound only partially (!) together so it could still drain. Same with sutures, were one to do that. Don't close the wound.

In all my years treating wounds in the backcountry, I've only ever irrigated (I carry a 50 cc syringe for that), put compress & bandage on (control bleeding, cover wound from infection, protect from further injury). Then I strongly urge them to go to someone who knows what they're doing -- an ER or their own doctor.

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rlown
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by rlown » Tue Jul 18, 2017 7:32 pm

If you suture, you don't close the wound all the way. This is only in emergency. You only do that if blood loss is an issue and that is a skill all its own. It is true the wound has to drain. You do enough to keep it "sterile" and clean. As my dog bit my finger, the doctor looked at it and put on steri-strips. They fell off in one night. Antibiotics worked better. Still waiting for the nail to grow back out.

Watched my Vet sew Samantha back up after a cyst on her side ruptured. Drain tube in place but a massive hole in her side. Necrotic tissue removed. I should have been a veterinarian. Poor girl had to wear one of my old t-shirts for a week.

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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by mrphil » Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:07 am

I would love to carry sutures and lidocaine...as well as everything else for survival that can fit into my portable kitchen sink, and my main first-aid kit pretty much does (all wrapped nicely into a Sam-Splint with a couple cravats thrown in for good measure) , but I'm really surprised that no one has mentioned something as basic, not at all bulky, and relatively inexpensive as bloodstoppers for traumatic wounds. Impregnated with Celox granules (a hemostatic agent) is best. For smaller wounds, open the package, tear off what you need, pack the wound, put and keep pressure on it. Throw half a dozen 4x4s, a couple 3" rolls of self-adhesive roller bandages, maybe a pair of forceps for arterial damage into it, and you have just about all you need for a military-grade wound kit that any individual would carry. And of course, it never hurts to have a few band-aids for those annoying minor cuts that won't close up and get blood all over your stuff.

You can freeze, starve, or be irretrievably lost, and you might die slowly, but for a fast and guaranteed death, there's nothing like uncontrollably bleeding out and having no means to stop it to wreck an otherwise perfect day.

A friend along for company and backup is also nice to have.

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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by jakeyjohn1 » Sun Aug 06, 2017 3:03 pm

I think QuikClot makes gauze and 'sponges' designed for consumer use that incorporate 'bloodstoppers' similar to what Mrphil is referring to

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mrphil
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Re: Emergency kit for day hikes

Post by mrphil » Sun Aug 06, 2017 5:48 pm

Thanks for mentioning that. I always learned them as "bloodstoppers" and continue to use the name in the generic sense for them all. But yeah, you're absolutely right, the QuickClots have a reputation for being the best, especially with traumatic arterial damage. It's not often that something that can fit in your pocket or is available to everyone can potentially do so much to save a life.

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