Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Share your advice and personal experiences, post a gear review or ask any questions you may have pertaining to outdoor gear and equipment.
User avatar
John Harper
Topix Regular
Posts: 320
Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:54 am
Experience: N/A

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by John Harper » Mon Feb 22, 2016 5:04 pm

This seems to be the new Sierra Designs tent, as far a I can tell:
http://www.sierradesigns.com/product/flashlight-1-fl

It looks like the mesh/inner wall and fly are permanently attached, so if you like to sleep under the stars (I do) on clear nights, no bueno.

I'm still looking at the MSR Hubba NX-1 or that Marmot EOS 1p. The MSR is a bit more expensive, but has great reviews, and I know three others personally that have them. Both have detachable flys as well!

I looked a the Big Sky website too, and just kind of glazed over!!! Too many decisions to make, so overpowering on your brain!

Marmot has kind of disappointed me, my bag has twice had to be sent back for zipper issues. MSR gets good marks in servce too, not to denigrate Marmot, just a design/quality issue for me. They fixed the bag, second time it cost me, however. We'll see how this season fares.

John








User avatar
Thebrenner
Topix Acquainted
Posts: 38
Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:51 pm
Experience: N/A
Location: Santa Barbara
Contact:

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by Thebrenner » Wed Feb 24, 2016 9:31 pm

For the past 3 years I have used the Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1. I replaced the original poles with carbon fiber poles and made
modifications to the guy-lines for a packed weight of 31.40 ounces. I do not use a footprint. I have had the tent in rain, lots of rain, and wind lots of wind. I have never had a problem and there is plenty of room inside the tent for myself and all my gear.

This year I'm trying the Six-Moon Designs Trekker X because I wanted to see what it was like to use my trekking poles to set up a tent and wanted to see if I could get my tent a bit lighter. Also I like a side entry door, and this one has 2! The total weight is 20.82 ounces.
I am taking this tent out on a maiden voyage this weekend.

Another tent I'm interested in is the Nemo Hornet 1p. It is double walled, and has a side entry door. It weighs 29 ounces.

I'll be curious to see what you settle on!
brenner

User avatar
gary c.
Topix Fanatic
Posts: 1285
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2006 4:56 pm
Experience: N/A
Location: Lancaster, CA

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by gary c. » Wed Feb 24, 2016 11:37 pm

WD, I know that performance is more of an issue for you over price but keep an eye on http://www.steepandcheap.com/home. There has been a lot of good mark downs the last few months. Here is a current link to the Sierra Designs Flashlight tent mentioned above at almost half the price. http://www.steepandcheap.com/gear-cache ... 01A-ALUASH


http://www.steepandcheap.com/gear-cache ... collection

These sales are only good for another 4 days but there will be something else put up in their place no dobt.
"On this proud and beautiful mountain we have lived hours of fraternal, warm and exalting nobility. Here for a few days we have ceased to be slaves and have really been men. It is hard to return to servitude."
-- Lionel Terray

User avatar
Wandering Daisy
Topix Docent
Posts: 4665
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:19 pm
Experience: N/A
Location: Fair Oaks CA (Sacramento area)
Contact:

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by Wandering Daisy » Fri Feb 26, 2016 4:19 pm

I am back. The trip confirmed the fact that I definitely want a double wall tent, and preferably one with material, not mesh, on the top so drips do not directly go on my head! I wrote a trip report (beyond Sierra) that details my misery with my Tarptent.

So those of you who use trekking pole to hold up the tent, what do you do when you want to take the trekking poles on a day hike?

I was wondering more about condensation. It seems that there always will be moisture in the tent, and the real issue is dew point. Assuming good air flow in both cases, does the ratio of the size of the person (ie, heat given off) to the inside volume of the tent make any difference? If the tent were oversized, is it possible that it would be colder relative to a smaller tent, thus dew point reached when it may not be reached with more heat? Other than comfort and easier entry and exit or not rubbing against the tent walls, is there an advantage of a bigger tent volume? It seems to me that you would be warmer in a smaller volume tent. I am beginning to feel like Goldilocks! Is there a "just right"?

It would also seem to me that having your head (an breathing) at the highest point of the tent would be better to avoid condensation. For example the Fly Creek design has your head at the higher point, whereas my Moment has my head at the lower point, as well as feet.

I am not totally against another Tarptent, but not the Moment style design. I tend to want a smaller tent, for the weight savings as well as small footprint. Most tents are 85-90 inches long. I am only 64 inches long. I rarely camp at established campsites and usually am trying to squeeze into a small space. And I think small is better for wind. But then, I do not want a coffin either. I already have one of those- my bivy!

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10641
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by maverick » Fri Feb 26, 2016 5:01 pm

So those of you who use trekking pole to hold up the tent, what do you do when you want to take the trekking poles on a day hike?
Had a Wanderlust tent that utilized a trekking pole for its set up, if going on day hike, put rocks or something else to weight the tent down, just in case it got windy.

I was wondering more about condensation. It seems that there always will be moisture in the tent, and the real issue is dew point. Assuming good air flow in both cases, does the ratio of the size of the person (ie, heat given off) to the inside volume of the tent make any difference? If the tent were oversized, is it possible that it would be colder relative to a smaller tent, thus dew point reached when it may not be reached with more heat? Other than comfort and easier entry and exit or not rubbing against the tent walls, is there an advantage of a bigger tent volume? It seems to me that you would be warmer in a smaller volume tent.

Ventilation/air flow is the best way to avoid condensation (doors/vents open), avoiding damp grounds, using a plastic ground sheet, making sure nothing is touching the walls, but even after taking these precautions, there are circumstances when no matter what you do there will be condensation, in that case you just deal with it by wiping down the walls.

Is there a "just right"?
Perfect tent doesn't exist.
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
AlmostThere
Topix Addict
Posts: 2722
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2009 4:38 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by AlmostThere » Fri Feb 26, 2016 6:11 pm

Lightheart Gear Solo.

You can get tent poles for it, but trekking poles work great. Plenty of room for a person plus gear plus a medium sized dog. Weather proof, and the awnings roll up and you get views and ventilation. With the awnings down, still has decent ventilation. I think I may have had a few drips of condensation but nothing to write home about. It does fine shedding wind.

Not free standing, but neither is the Moment.

I've been happy enough with it that when the zippers blew and the floor became nearly transparent, I looked at all the Tarptents, Six Moon, Zpacks, etc. tents out there, and ordered another Solo. The price point, features, weather worthiness, hybrid double wall structure and light weight all together were just what I look for.

User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
Posts: 10641
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by maverick » Fri Feb 26, 2016 6:18 pm

Here is a discussion about the Lightheart Solo and the Moment: https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/29373/
That LHS really looks like my Wanderlust Nomad. :)
Professional Sierra Landscape Photographer

I don't give out specific route information, my belief is that it takes away from the whole adventure spirit of a trip, if you need every inch planned out, you'll have to get that from someone else.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org

User avatar
Wandering Daisy
Topix Docent
Posts: 4665
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:19 pm
Experience: N/A
Location: Fair Oaks CA (Sacramento area)
Contact:

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by Wandering Daisy » Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:16 pm

Another question. I have never had one of those "hub" pole designs. We do have a tent with a cross bar and I have a heck of a time putting it on - very tight, my husband always has to do that part. I certainly cannot have a tent that I cannot put together myself. To me, the simpler the better as far as tent poles go. I do not want to have to figure out a puzzle or see how strong my arms are at the end of a day!

I did a lot of reading the last two days and found some interesting stuff. Evidently, the "misting" problem with some SilNylon can be solved simply be adding a layer or two of sealant - same as sealing the seams but just do the whole tent. The cost is about $10 and it increases the weight of the tent about 2-3 oz. Still frustrating that you would have to pay about $300 for a new tent and then have to do that, but at least, if a tent is perfect in every other respect and that was the only problem, it is an option.

One thing that is seldom discussed is the water retention of different tent fabrics. Evidently Cuben does not retain moisture so even if packed wet, just wipe it off and it weighs nearly the same as a dry tent. Whereas, SilNylon , especially as it ages, can absorb moisture into the fabric, so even if you wipe it off, if you have to carry a wet tent, there is a significant added weight, in addition to the fact that a wet soggy tent cannot be packed inside the pack. The other little hidden weight, is that some of the extremely UL tent floors really need a footprint or at least Tyvek sheet under if camping on anything rocky -sort of normal conditions for me. So the few ounces less that you pay dearly for is lost when you have to add the footprint. And the stupid lack of information on total weight- for example my Moment's advertised weight only includes two stakes. Practically, I never go out without carrying six stakes. And on some tents impractically small stakes are provided simply to keep the advertised weight down. So you pay additional $$ for an advertised weight, then have to go out and buy heavier stakes just to use the stupid thing. You do not get a lot of "truth in advertising" when considering a tent. All sorts of tricks in the contest of who has the lightest tent.

Why are big manufacturers, like Big Agnes or MSR, not offering Cuben fiber tent flies? Or at least the option of paying more for a Cuben fly. Do you think if I just waited a year, they will start doing this? I could re-seal my poor old Moment and limp along another year if I knew that was in the works.

So here is where I am; Design-wise I cannot help but love the Copper Spur UL1, but weather worthiness in continuous rain worries me plus the thinner fabric. Hubba NX-1 almost fits the bill, but almost too narrow (no room for my dog). But for both of these, I have never set up a hub-pole system. Tarptent Notch or just the newer double wall version of the Moment also appealing but all I have read about exclusively SilNylon tents makes me reluctant. Hilleberg Akto looks good, but I am not yet there on the extra weight. The lighter Hilleberg models specifically say to be used in moderate climates and I cannot find any comparison between Kerlon 1000 and the 30D, 3000 psi rating on the Hubba. I like the Nallo but there is no 1-person Nallo, the 2-person tent way too heavy.

The plan now is to buy the Hubba NX-1 through REI and if I do not like it I can return it without shipping costs. Next, do the same with the Copper Spur. If that does not work out, then start on the tents that are not offered through REI. In the good old days before internet shopping and 100 tents to choose from, REI actually had most of the tents in their stores so you could just go there for an afternoon and set up tents. Not so anymore. Like "too much information", I am overwhelmed by "too many choices" and nowhere to see all in one place.

User avatar
Wandering Daisy
Topix Docent
Posts: 4665
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:19 pm
Experience: N/A
Location: Fair Oaks CA (Sacramento area)
Contact:

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by Wandering Daisy » Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:21 pm

Oh, yes I saw that Lightheart Solo discussion. I want a double wall tent where the fly can be totally detached from the tent. It looks to me that the Lightheart Solo has them attached. Thanks for the link.

User avatar
LMBSGV
Topix Expert
Posts: 756
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2007 8:42 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer
Location: San Geronimo, CA
Contact:

Re: Tents, tents, oh, what tent?

Post by LMBSGV » Sun Feb 28, 2016 11:05 pm

The reason I got the Hubba Hubba NX versus the Hubba was the space issue. Even though technically the specs say it's a two person tent, I got the Hubba Hubba NX as a solo tent because, as some reviews point out, the Hubba Hubba is a cramped two person tent. Since I put the camera bag, tripod, notebook, etc along one side (the space taken up by a sleeping bag), I find the Hubba Hubba works great as a one person tent. I feel there is lots of room and no sense of claustrophobia. With your dog you might want the Hubba Hubba.

The hubbed pole design is quite easy to put up after the first time of figuring it out. The diagram in the tent stuff bag is helpful in jogging one's memory after not putting it up for a couple of months. The one bit of the instructions I wondered about is staking the corners down before attaching the poles since I'd never done this before except in high wind. I learned one needs to stake the corners down before attaching the pole, otherwise the tent will slide around all over the place. Once the tent is up, adjust the stakes a little for the space you are pitched in. Also, the stakes that come with the tent are not that great. I had one shatter when I was pounding it in on a rock-gravel surface. Bring along extra stakes that you know work correctly.

Lastly, I confess to hating the name hubba. My Think Tank camera bag and my tent are named hubba hubba. If they had existed back then, I'm sure Dante would have included a circle in hell for marketing departments.

Best of luck with your tent. So far, I'm happy with my Hubba Hubba, despite the name.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 3 guests