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Rainfly on a Nook

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Rainfly on a Nook

Postby alc101ma » Thu May 14, 2015 2:50 pm

Anyone out there have a MSR Nook?

I've had mine for about 5-6 years and the rainfly/vestibule material flaps like crazy in the wind. I have to carry ear plugs to sleep but in high winds (~20mph gusts) I can still hear it. :mad: I don't remember this being an issue when I first bought the tent and I wonder if I've somehow stretched the material over time. Even with the vestibule guyed out there is "extra" material between the guy point and the frame of the tent which sags a bit (and then flaps in the wind).

I'd like to confirm if anyone/everyone else has this problem (product design) or if I've indeed stretched out the material over time.



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Re: Rainfly on a Nook

Postby maverick » Thu May 14, 2015 3:56 pm

Welcome to HST! When you get the time would appreciate an intro: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=9329
Interesting, in OudoorGearLab in was said to be the strongest of the MSR tents: http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Backpacki ... s/MSR-Nook

Weather Resistance

We believe the Nook is MSR's strongest three-season tent. Unlike the Hubba Hubba, Carbon Reflex 2, and
Hoop, the Nook has a smaller and more aerodynamic design and many more guy points that help to support
the tent in high winds. It's the company's only tent that we feel secure in during serious three-season storms.
The waterproof floor extends up the walls enough to stop splashback and solid nylon panels extend four
inches up from there to block additional splashback or spindrift, and make the tent warmer. The rest of the
walls are mesh, which, when combined with two side vents, help to combat condensation better than the
average tent tested here.


Did you contact MSR about the issue?
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Re: Rainfly on a Nook

Postby Wandering Daisy » Fri May 15, 2015 2:45 pm

Silicon impregnated nylon will stretch significantly when wet. So during a dry windy night it may be tight, but then if soaked by rain, and wind picks up, it will stretch and flap. What is the fly material? Maybe there are other materials that do this too. It also could be a particular wind direction relative to the shape of the tent. If the tent is not absolutely 3-d symmetrical, it will perform better in some wind directions and less so in others.

The manufacturer's statement that the Nook is the only one of their tents that can withstand a serious 3-season storm is quite startling! :eek: Why would anyone even own a tent that cannot withstand a serious 3-season storm?

Tent flapping during high winds is common, even when tied down properly and designed for wind. As long as the tent stays in place and is stable, I would also just put in ear plugs.
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Re: Rainfly on a Nook

Postby Wandering Daisy » Fri May 15, 2015 2:48 pm

just thought of another issue. A 5-year old fly that is used a lot, will have sustained significant UV damage. This often makes the material stiffer and more brittle, which also would be more noisy. Maybe you need a new tent.
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