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Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 11:48 am
by longri
AlmostThere wrote:no one said you would die.


You've never heard "cotton kills"?

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:20 pm
by markskor
longri wrote:I still hike in a cotton t-shirt ...

Sierra - June and July, usually that means no rain and even lower humidity...(I know, but usually).

I too confess to wearing cotton...almost live in a loose, long sleeve, 100% cotton shirt. (the thick, well-made, mosquito-proof kind.)

Been doing this for years - Not dead yet.
Here's a flash...Cotton shirts work well in our dry conditions!
But maybe I don't get out enough...
BTW, on trips over 12 nights, I do carry another shirt too - synthetic but prefer the cotton.

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:46 pm
by Wandering Daisy
Jeans, even when dry, are heavy. It would be the same concept as wearing heavy boots. Every time you move your legs you are weighted down. Once wet, jeans weigh a TON! I would never take an item backpacking if I had to also carry a "back up" for rain, and then be stuck with a wet dishrag to carry. On the other hand, I do take a very light (3 oz) cotton undershirt that actually dries quickly. I wash this shirt every day.

High quality climbing pants are really tough. I like Shoeller dry-skin. I now use ArcTerex climbing pants. They weigh about 12 oz (size small) - a bit pricy but really tough. Most climbing pants are heavier than light nylon hiking pants, but I have fallen into a stream and come out nearly dry and punctured them with branches and no permanent holes. Technical climbing pants are made to withstand a lot of abrasion.

And, fess up. If we gain in girth as we age, do we still try to squeeze into those nylon pants that fit a few years earlier? A fat butt puts a lot of stress on sewn seam.

If you care not about style you can sew a seat patch and knee patches on your nylon pants. I always wonder why manufacturers do not make the seat double to begin with.

Jeans may be OK for a short weekend trip with a good weather forecast, but I would not count on them for a week long trip, even in the Sierra. Now, desert hiking is another thing. Maybe OK there.

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:56 pm
by acorad
I usually hike in running shorts. Very lightweight, dry quickly, loose fitting so no blow-outs, support net inside, etc.

Andy

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:21 pm
by freestone
The only time I don't wear jeans is when I backpack. No sense in wearing something thats going to remind me of work and everyday life. I must admit, I have entertained thoughts of wearing tailored lightweight wool dress slacks backpacking. They are lighter, repel dirt, and insulate better than jeans. Haven't done it yet, there are so many other better lightweight options now.

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:52 pm
by RoguePhotonic
I've used Rail Rider pants on two major hikes now including major bush whacking and they have held up well. If I can wear them for 130 days in the Sierra and come back with only a couple holes near the ankle and a small cut or two where I sliced myself then they are good enough for me. Considering I wear and XL size and they still only weigh 10 ounces it's hard to beat.

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 2:52 pm
by Buford
Others already covered most of the cotton issues, but another problem not mentioned with wet cotton is chafing.

People have worn cotton out doors for a long time, most have lived :) . But why not wear something lighter, quick drying, could be just as tough, won't chafe when wet, better in hot conditions, etc.

I have a cotton bandana, everything else is wool or synthetic.

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 5:13 pm
by sparky
I wear a pair of midweight wool pants hiking, have for about 5 or 6 years. They are not as thin as dress slacks. They work really well. They are actually a wool blend and they look like they were uniform pants of some sort, either riverside county sherriff or forest service as they are olive green. Anyway, they are extremely durable, warm when cool, cool when warm, and dry pretty darn fast. Best part is they were like 2$ at the thrift store, and found another pair of the exact same trousers at the thrift store last year. I am set for the next decade! The bushwacking can be brutal in my local mountains and these pants have really held up well.

Drying out clothing over a fire is a huge pain in the ass!!

Re: jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 5:39 am
by vandman
I wear shorts, unless it's 32ยบ or less. Then I pull on some nylon running tights. It's not pretty but very effective.

jeans vs ???

PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2014 7:46 am
by AlmostThere
longri wrote:
AlmostThere wrote:no one said you would die.


You've never heard "cotton kills"?


all the time. we continue to teach it to people who ask what to wear because it is easier than standing around explaining the physics of cotton and when it's appropriate. It's just easier to say to wear things that dry quickly and easily with body heat.