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Everest books

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Everest books

Postby AldeFarte » Sun Feb 10, 2008 1:41 am

Finished reading Krakaur's account "Into thin Air" and Anatoli Boukreev"s account of the same episode . For the second time. I wonder why that tragedy is so fascinating? I think one should not read Krakaurs account without reading Boukreev after. A great man was slighted by Krakuar and his attempt to clear the facts and his reputation is sobering. jls



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Re: Everest books

Postby gdurkee » Sun Feb 10, 2008 1:48 pm

I absolutely agree with that. I don't understand why Krakauer was so heavy handed in his assessment of Boukreev. Survivor's guilt is the only thing I could come up with. I also thought Anatoli's account the more interesting and, when the 'as told to' author didn't get in the way, the more lyrical at times.

g
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Re: Everest books

Postby dblknot » Thu May 14, 2009 9:14 am

Have you come across this gem by any chance?

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/ ... lleypac-20

Couldn't recommend a better read.
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Re: Everest books

Postby paul » Mon Sep 14, 2009 7:42 pm

Well, I have read both books and my take is a little different. I'll preface my opinion by saying that I consider Mr. Boukeev's rescue efforts to be heroic. But I think that how you look at it depends on what you consider the role of a guide to be. As I see it, the role of a guide is to actually guide the clients, and to make the decisions for them that they do not have the experience to make. Since Mr. Boukreev was hired as a guide, he should have fulfilled that role, but he did not. If he had, he could have prevented most of the deaths by turning the clients around when they should have been turned around. He says that he intended to get up and down quickly so as to be in a position to mount a rescue attempt, but again, he could have precluded the need for a rescue attempt by fulfilling the role of the guide. He also says that his arrangement with Scott Fischer made it clear that he would act as he did - that is, not function as a guide on the summit day. If this is really true, then he was - what? Apparently both a guide and not a guide, depending on where he was on the mountain - which seems like a recipe for trouble. True, his boss should have been the one responsible for turning his clients around - as Rob Hall should have done for his clients - but any professional guide should put client safety first, and reaching the summit second.
So, as a rescuer Mr. Boukreev was a hero, but as a guide he was a failure. That is how it looks to me from a reading of the two books, and It seems to me that is the way Mr. Krakauer views it as well - though I think Mr. Krakauer would be the first to point out that since he was on the mountain at the time, and subject to the effects of altitude as all involved were, his view of the events is not an objective one, and in fact it is essentially impossible to reach a completely objective view of the ecents of that day, since all involved were affected by the altitude, and so many are not alive to tell their stories.
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Re: Everest books

Postby packmule » Wed Sep 30, 2009 4:00 pm

I read the "Dark Summit" which is basicly a preview to Discoveries (Beyond the Limit). The Lincoln Hall story is one that I need to follow up on!
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Re: Everest books

Postby Sam Page » Fri Dec 04, 2009 7:22 pm

packmule wrote:I read the "Dark Summit" which is basicly a preview to Discoveries (Beyond the Limit). The Lincoln Hall story is one that I need to follow up on!


I just finished reading Dark Summit and posted a review on my blog. Here is the first paragraph:

In spring 1996, over ten climbers died in a storm while climbing Mt. Everest, including the accomplished leaders of two commercial expeditions, Rob Hall and Scott Fischer. The story of that terrible season was told, not without controversy, by Jon Krakauer in his best-selling book Into Thin Air. In spring 2006, over ten climbers again died climbing Mt. Everest, but this time in relatively fine weather. Nick Heil explains what went wrong in his book Dark Summit: The True Story of Mt. Everest's Most Controversial Season, published in 2008.

Here is the rest of my review
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Re: Everest books

Postby AldeFarte » Thu Feb 18, 2010 11:06 pm

I recently read Dark Summit.An interesting read. I would hope that if I was in the position to render assistance to a fellow climber in need, that I would do so and damn the summit. Regarding the 96 season. If I can recall the story correctly, I think none of the climbers that Boukreev was responsible for guiding died on the mountain that year. He was a hell of a guide. jls
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