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TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby Wandering Daisy » Sun Jul 28, 2013 12:37 pm

Fish really do not add a lot of calories, but are a great source of protein. I divide a whole meal in two for 2-3 days of a 7-8 day trip with the idea of catching fish. The biggest thing with eating fish is that I do not have to worry about getting enough protein. I find protein the hardest nutritional component to get in my backpack food. I really cannot afford the freeze dried meat and am not fond of the "protein powders". I prefer to keep my total daily food weight to 1.25 pounds. I know powdered milk is a good protein source, but it is bulky so hard to fit a lot in the bear canister. My last trip only had 14% protein, which I did not worry about because of the fish.

It does not bother me much to run out of food. I usually plan trips so that if I cannot catch fish and run low on food it is not too difficult to speed up the schedule and come out a day early. I have ended a lot of trips TOTALLY empty - with no trail food for the last day. I have done several 4-day no-food, 50 mile walk out survivals so have a good idea of how my body responds to starvation and do not freak out when I run out of food.

It has been a challenge this year with only stoves allowed. I only brought one 1-L cook pot. I ended up boiling the fish, then de-boning, and then adding the potatoes. Or if I cooked rice or pasta I would just put the fish in with the rice or pasta, cook it and then de-bone the fish. I prefer to fry fish but did not want to carry the weight of the heavy frying pan. It has occurred to me (although I have not done it) that you could use freezer bag cooking for fish. Put the fish in the bag and cook with the meal and then pull out the bag and de-bone the fish. That way you could eliminate all those little bones that end up in the pot.

Well this was a long windy reply! Bottom line - I REDUCE food I bring when I fish, but never totally eliminate a meal.



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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby mediauras » Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:41 pm

Awesome TR, makes me want to take up fishing in the sierras. Are you using a tenkara set-up?
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby KathyW » Sun Jul 28, 2013 4:48 pm

Thanks for the report and beautiful photos. I hope to get to see that area first hand eventually, but in the mean time it is nice to see photos of the area.
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby rlown » Sun Jul 28, 2013 4:54 pm

yikes! boiled trout. the fry pan alone with that comment is worth it.

A pretty stringer of brookies, WD!
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TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby AlmostThere » Sun Jul 28, 2013 5:10 pm

I poach them - wrap in foil with seasonings, put rocks in the bottom of the pot and add water just barely covering them, put in fish. Works about like putting them in coals and the end result is the same.
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby rlown » Sun Jul 28, 2013 5:15 pm

on the fish id thing. I looked for a good 20 mins on the CA DFW site. how lame that they don't have a fish ID page other than saltwater.

anyway, here's a pointer to Idaho's DFW id page. Same id stuff: http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/fish/?getPage=85

anytime you see that cadmium color on the lower fins, it's a brookie. color does vary depending on time of year, but they become obvious.
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby SSSdave » Mon Jul 29, 2013 1:56 pm

Yikes! Don't know what is worse, taking those long, inefficient, hot trails around Florence or Edison versus using their ferries.

Some comments for those who might try following your footsteps... Going from Rose Marie Meadow to Orchid Lake, large scale route finding is not that difficult if one sizes up the 7.5m topo as you did, however as noted the small scale terrain is an obstacle course to navigate through. Going from Orchid to Apollo Lake might seem a simple task but looking at the topo shows one needs to be careful else will look down over ledges. Much more difficult going from Apollo Lake to Cirque Lake that requires expert route finding and map reading skills else one is likely to get into unpleasant terrain. Thinking one can just traverse around the ridge without dropping down significantly will only bring one to where one does not want to go.

Was surprised you were even considering carrying your backpack from Rosebud to Hooper as the west side as the map shows is very steep at the top. You probably came down from the saddle between 11884 and 11681?

As for identifying trout, read/look at this page:

http://troutfrenzy.com/index.asp?pg=ca_species

But note all trout tend to vary in coloration even within the same lake, especially between male and female, young trout and mature trout. And rainbow and golden trout hybridize. Eastern brook do not hybridize with any rainbow/cutthroat species despite what one sometimes reads on boards like this. Brown trout have the most consistent coloration. Mature golden trout loose their parr marks leaving a red side stripe against olive without spots except at the tail turning to yellow then red underneath. Those mature goldens also have multi neon colored guts, have deep red flesh like fresh caught steelhead, and males may have a hooked jaw. Also IMO are the finest tasting freshwater trout much like the best fresh salmon or steelhead:

Image

Hybrid golden rainbows will have more spots along the back. Rainbow have a number of sub-species color variants.
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby Fly Guy Dave » Mon Jul 29, 2013 3:20 pm

One of hobbies is to catch all of the species and sub-species of salmonids in North America and over the years I have caught quite a few and posted pictures of them on my blog, a link to this site is below my signature on all of my posts. I know this is a shameless plug, :o but rest assured, I gain nothing from it, I'm merely hoping the pictures posted there can help clarify which kind of fish is which.

--Fly Guy Dave
"Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man." --Jeff Lebowski

Some pics of native salmonids: http://flyguydave.wordpress.com/
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby Wandering Daisy » Mon Jul 29, 2013 3:43 pm

Now that I have done the route, I would carry a light, end-of-trip, pack from Rosebud Lake to Crazy Lake. I would also take a short line to lower the pack over a few short cliffy sections. It looks worse than it is. At the top on the right side of the saddle there is an obvious sandy chute that leads to the steeper cliffy section. I first did a descending traverse south, then turned around to head northwest, aiming for rock slabs that are much easier. If you continued to traverse south you would end up in a boulder field. You come out at the north point of Crazy Lake. There are a lot of very sturdy small scrub trees on the hillside that offer good handholds if needed. In fact, one route finding issue is to avoid bushwhacking. It is either class 2+ or easy class 3. You definitely do rock scrambling and a bit of jungle bashing. The rock slabs are moderately steep - not easy if you are not experienced in friction walking on slabs.

Image
Approximate Route

Does anyone know if that pass has a name?
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby Tom_H » Mon Jul 29, 2013 7:08 pm

Fantastic report, WD, with great pictures. You are an excellent writer. I enjoyed the TR very much!
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby giantbrookie » Mon Jul 29, 2013 7:52 pm

Wandering Daisy wrote:It has been a challenge this year with only stoves allowed. I only brought one 1-L cook pot. I ended up boiling the fish, then de-boning, and then adding the potatoes. Bottom line - I REDUCE food I bring when I fish, but never totally eliminate a meal.

I eat so much in the high country (I just eat a lot, period) I just don't want to take the chance I will get skunked based on one unpleasant experience of the sort. Once long ago (1987), I took a very much smaller food supply on a trip I figured I'd catch plenty of fish. I caught and released oodles of fish while hiking to my first night's campsite, then struck out at the lake I camped at (reserve dinner food consumed). On my 2nd day, hungry after a long dayhike to climb Mt Rodgers, I descended to places where I had caught and released many fish the day before. Skunk-in-clutch for night no. 2 (consumed remaining breakfast food for dinner). The next morning (fortunately, last of trip), I arose famished and hiked out toward the car. I stopped to fish at Gem Lake on the way, caught some nice brookies (biggest one went 14"), unpacked my stove and pot, and cooked them for a much welcomed brunch. Ever since that trip I have carried enough food to assure that I eat well every day of the trip even if I don't catch fish for 7 days. I haven't reached the point where I really care about weight that much, so the fact that I hike out with excess "reserve" food does not bother me. In the meantime, I get a nice menu variety because I'll usually do part of the non fish meal (pasta or rice dish) along with the fish (will also have a side dish of reconstituted veggies each evening, too). In no-campfire areas, my fish cooking scheme is like this: I cook the fish in the pot with a little bit of oil, just a pinch of water, and some teriyaki sauce. I try to have just the right amount of liquid so that is has mostly boiled off leaving a nice sauce with some crunchiness on the bottom side when done. Given that this takes awhile to clean out of the pot after I'm done, I do the non-fish part of the meal first. In campfire-legal areas, I take one or two folding grills (depends on how large my group is), lightly salt the fish and BBQ them over the coals. That is how I like my fish the best, but it isn't an option where campfires are prohibited. On some trips, I'm set up for both types of fish cooking scenarios. Tunechuck 2008 was an example with part of the trip in no-campfire (above Seki elevation cutoff) and part of the trip below (Woodchuck country).
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
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Re: TR: Part II Blackcap Basin Plus

Postby Wandering Daisy » Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:12 pm

I have reached the point where pack weight matters, a lot. I rather eat less than have my back ache all day and night. I sort of have a total pack weight limit, beyond which I am just miserable. Steamed or boiled fish are fine with me. In fact, if it were safe, I would prefer just to eat fish raw. I love sushi. When my husband goes with me we do take the bigger frying pan and fry the fish. Having two to share the load really helps. If I were to do a 2-3 day fishing trip, then I also would take better cooking gear. Luckily, I have found that as I get older, I need less food, thank goodness because I am not able to carry as much as I would have eaten when I was younger.

Speaking of fire restrictions and smoke, it has been smoky all day up here in Sacramento, from the forest fires, the Aspen fire to the south and a fire on the Oregon border. I am headed down to go out over Kerasarge Pass mid week - sure hope the wind does not shift and blow smoke that way.
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