The least visited lake. | High Sierra Topix  

The least visited lake.

If you've been searching for the best source of information and stimulating discussion related to Spring/Summer/Fall backpacking, hiking and camping in the Sierra Nevada...look no further!
User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby RoguePhotonic » Sat Feb 01, 2014 5:35 pm

I don't think the one above Cartridge Creek should be too hard to get to. I plan to go there this summer.

I've thought about those lakes around Marion & State Peaks looking down on them from both Marion and Arrow Peaks. They do look like a pain to reach. Never been there and not so sure I would ever try.



User avatar
RoguePhotonic
Topix Fanatic
 
Posts: 1667
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:52 am
Location: Bakersfield CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby sparky » Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:43 pm

JD: Which picture is of middle fork goodale creek? The last one?

Visited the lake on the north fork goodale creek, it was nice. The tarn shown on the topo above it was dry in Oct 2012. It is also probably very seldom visited as Taboose or Armstrong is a much better route for peaks in the area.

Image
There is a million ways to be human, all are worthwhile.

True happiness is the absence of striving for happiness.
-Chuang Tzu.
User avatar
sparky
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 880
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 10:01 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby John Dittli » Sun Feb 09, 2014 9:31 am

Yes Sparky, the last one. Good on ya for visiting the one in the Nfk. I had my eye on that one as well. Is the peak in your photo on the divide between N and middle fk?
Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
User avatar
John Dittli
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 470
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 10:38 am
Location: Crooked Creek
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby sparky » Sun Feb 09, 2014 9:56 am

Correct

Image

Image
There is a million ways to be human, all are worthwhile.

True happiness is the absence of striving for happiness.
-Chuang Tzu.
User avatar
sparky
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 880
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 10:01 am
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby John Dittli » Sun Feb 09, 2014 10:22 am

nice!
Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
User avatar
John Dittli
Topix Expert
 
Posts: 470
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 10:38 am
Location: Crooked Creek
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby maverick » Mon Feb 10, 2014 8:49 pm

Hi JD,

That lake was very pretty and the peak was just spectacular. Hope to get back there
with my gear one day. Lake on South Fork of Goodale looks promising on the map too.
The whole canyon was ablaze with fall colors when Sparky and myself went on our
search for Larry, some of the best fall color displays that I have ever witnessed.
Only problem is that you need a high clearance vehicle because the road from Taboose
is extremely rough, four wheel drive would be even better, don't even think about
attempting it with a regular passenger vehicle, though one could drive up as far as
they could get from Goodale Creek Campground and hike the remainder of the way. :-k
HST= Wilderness Adventurer who knows no bounds, except for their own imagination.

Have a safer backcountry experience by using the HST ReConn Form 2.0, named after Larry Conn, a HST member: http://reconn.org
User avatar
maverick
Forums Moderator
Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 8039
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:54 pm
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby wildhiker » Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:10 am

Wandering Daisy wrote:Below 11,000, not a "tarn" which I take to mean not a little pond, and a lake that I have camped at, elimitates many of my remote locations. Here is what is left:

...
Lost Lakes SW of Koip Crest


I took my kids camping to the Lost Lakes SW of Koip Crest in about 1994. The cross-country route was written up in a Wilderness Press guidebook, so I am sure many others have been there, too.

-Phil
User avatar
wildhiker
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 4:44 pm
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby wildhiker » Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:20 am

Ikan Mas wrote:I have found obsidion many places in the Sierras. Although the numbers of Native Americans in the mountains was probably never large, they were there for 10,000 to 20,000 years, depending on what theory you subscribe to. Of course for some of this time the mountains were under glaciers, but they were here for a long time. They knew all the major passes and probably roamed quite widely.

Two years ago as my brother and I hiked down Kerrick Meadows we noted that we found obsidion at every place we stopped. So we began to think about it more deeply. We liked to stop a places with a nice view and water nearby. We also liked to find a nice smooth rock to sit on. We realized that our needs were the same as theirs. Think about about this a you pull over for a break. The somewhat sparse grass cover in Kerrick made finding the obsidion very easy.

Last summer at Summit Lake above the San Joaquin River, one end of the lake was thoroughly covered with obsidion. I took this spot as a trading or rendevous point. There must of been lots of people here over the years.


There are obsidian "flakes" (small pieces) all over the high sierra for many miles radius around the Mammoth Mountain area. I found them all over the ground in the Mono Pass (Yosemite) area, for example. I asked a geology professor I know about them. She said they are due to a major volcanic explosion from one of those volcanoes south of Mono Lake a few thousand years ago. They are NOT from native americans dropping them everywhere. Now, if you find an actual worked arrowhead, that is another story. We found one in the Tuolumne River in Lyell Canyon once. I made the kids put it back.

-Phil
User avatar
wildhiker
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 132
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 4:44 pm
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby oldranger » Mon Feb 17, 2014 10:52 am

Wildhiker wrote:

They are NOT from native americans dropping them everywhere. Now, if you find an actual worked arrowhead, that is another story. We found one in the Tuolumne River in Lyell Canyon once. I made the kids put it back.


So it is just coincidence that there is a concentration of flakes (with no actual points)at obviously attractive sites? ;)

Kudos on kepping the point at the site!

Mike
Mike

Who can't do everything he used to and what he can do takes a hell of a lot longer!
User avatar
oldranger
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 2170
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 9:18 pm
Location: Bend, Oregon
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby rlown » Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:47 am

think of several thousands of big a$$ rocks of obsidian spitting out of a volcano, thousands of feet in the air (remember volcano) and then touching down miles away and shattering. One could see that maybe that happened before locals found it and worked it, but it's everywhere if you look around that area.

point work is the key. not just obsidian flakes.
User avatar
rlown
Topix Junkie
 
Posts: 5350
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 5:00 pm
Location: Petaluma and Wilton, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby RoguePhotonic » Mon Nov 24, 2014 7:08 am

So other than visiting the Ragged Spur Lake this summer I also went to the one just East of Windy Point. One member asked me for a fish report. I have not got to those photos yet to post the lake but the lake has no fish in it but supports very nice camping. There was an illegal fire pit sat on an open granite area near the lake for seemingly no reason at all considering all the nice locations you could build a fire. And of course had foil in it. I broke it up. The only other sign of humans at this lake was a couple pieces of rusty cans on the North shore.

It's also quite easy to climb up the East then North slope of Windy Point which is what I did rather than back track to Grey Pass and up from there.

Considering how out of the way this lake is and the quality of the scenery I doubt I will ever go back.
User avatar
RoguePhotonic
Topix Fanatic
 
Posts: 1667
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 9:52 am
Location: Bakersfield CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Re: The least visited lake.

Postby SweetSierra » Mon Nov 24, 2014 1:10 pm

Hobbes wrote:Funston?

I'm always going out of Horseshoe, either via Cottonwood or (New) Army passes, to hit Calipedder's planned destination. (And to paraphrase Terry Hatcher, "it's real and spectacular".) Funston just sits out there all by itself (I don't count the proximity to Rocky Basin lakes), around 6 miles x-country off the PCT.

I'm thinking of adding an extra day to loop the 12 miles in/out the next time I'm up there this summer. I searched HST, and all I came across was an old rumor that while it might not be on the gill net list (like the GT watershed to the south ie Chickenspring, Rocky) it may now be non-maintained.

Does anyone know if this is true? Or whether it matters? It's a nice size lake - about the same as Sky Blue - so it might be self-sustaining. OTOH, by the looks of things, there ain't much/any water the whole way there or back towards Rock Creek across Siberian. And given this dry year, it could be a slog.


I don't know whether Funston has fish or not, but Funston is a nice lake and has a remote feel. Two of us hiked from Rocky Basin lakes (we took the trail from Big Whitney Meadow to the lakes), dry camped on the ridge above the lakes, hiked to Funston, and back to the PCT across the Siberian Plateau. Another small lake is on the cross country route as you drop off the ridge above Rocky Basin lakes on the way to the Siberian Plateau. We walked around the meadows of the plateau, crossed the trail to Siberian Pass, and climbed to the PCT. It wasn't soggy in mid-July. The only water after the small lake was in a spring near the PCT junction, but we didn't need it. I remember talking with someone about this small lake and they said fishermen on horseback occasionally cross the plateau to fish and camp there. We didn't see any sign of a use trail on our plateau route, though. I loved that walk across the plateau. Beautiful views of the Miter Basin area and peaks to the north. But I love high, open country. :nod:
User avatar
SweetSierra
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 223
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 12:23 pm
Location: Nothern California
Experience: N/A

PreviousNext

Return to Backpacking / Hiking / Camping



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: wildhiker and 2 guests