Meeting people in the backcountry | High Sierra Topix  

Meeting people in the backcountry

If you've been searching for the best source of information and stimulating discussion related to Spring/Summer/Fall backpacking, hiking and camping in the Sierra Nevada...look no further!
User avatar

Postby giantbrookie » Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:44 am

admin wrote:John,

You might get a kick out of this... This is what I do for a living. I'm working with the FS Ag Dept on some joint projects (particularlythe viticulture dept): http://www.osterlingfamily.com/album/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=21&g2_serialNumber=4

I have some much higher resolution images of the campus, including some true color ones...

Neat photo. It took a second to realize that north was down (in part because the stadium was out of view to the right until I scrolled there). It's also a rather recent photo because it shows the new science building (Science II) where I have my office (building is less than a year old).
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html



User avatar
giantbrookie
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:22 am
Location: Fresno
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby ERIC » Thu Dec 29, 2005 11:40 am

Yep. I took that one in July 2005. The one below I took in September 2005. Both have been converted to low res jpegs so you can view them online. And neither one has been georeferenced. Just raw imagery oriented in the direction we flew over the area. In the true color (RGB) image, you can see people playing soccer to the left, and the field crew getting ready to paint the checkerboard on the north endzone of Bulldog Stadium.

http://www.osterlingfamily.com/album/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=2890&g2_serialNumber=1
User avatar
ERIC
Your Humble Host & Forums Administrator
Your Humble Host & Forums Administrator
 
Posts: 2909
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 9:13 am
Location: between the 916 and 661
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

--and ye shall receive!

Postby Timberline » Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:44 pm

To Trailblazer and all you respondents, thanks! Such a great topic with endless potential. You've answered my prayers (see Campfire post 12/30/05 "Introductions." This is what I hoped for; guess I'll have to look around this site some more!) Great stories; keep 'em coming! :)
Let 'er Buck! Back in Oregon again!
User avatar
Timberline
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 216
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 1:55 pm
Location: Prineville, Oregon (Since 7/15/13)
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby markskor » Mon Jan 02, 2006 11:31 pm

Ice Fishing at Saddlebag Lake

Depending on the previous winter’s storms, the snow depth, the weather, (maybe the phase of the moon), and a host other local political issues, Tioga – a pass between Crane Flats and Lee Vining – the old silver mining road, aka California Highway 120, re-opens every year sometime between April and June. Starting at snowline, lumbering snow-blowing machines gnaw ravenously through mountainous snowdrifts, insatiability burrowing; the evidence of their gorging, towering white plumes of spindrift spouted high as they work their way through frigid layers of annual veneer. Like the spume of a giant “Cal Trans” whale, (obviously a local species), these mega-machines climb out of their dormant summer caves, awaken, then inch forward – barely visible – subsurface, rabid. Moving at crawling speed, their true silhouettes clouded, hidden beneath white drifting clouds of their own making, they carve their way through a 20-foot high diet of verglas, pine needles, and Sierra cement. These mammoths start at opposite ends and meet somewhere in the middle, slicing out a well-manicured snow trough - mechanized moles – in their wake an ice channel – smooth sides - high walls: The road opening. It is always a welcome event - the highlight, a thin black exposed ribbon – wet asphalt marked by faded yellow stripes, a traverse across miles of raw granite, vividly depicted today in muted whites and various shades of gray. Tioga Pass is the only conduit, the only motor link available into the verdant depths of the Tuolumne.

This day, late April I think – maybe early May - found me hitchhiking, adventuring solo, thumb out, backpack and tuned mountaineering skis, standing huddled across the intersection occupied today by the Whoa Nellie Deli. The roads here below, dry… above, there the snow-lined road allowing the access still thawing out, calling out – one day freshly re-opened. Making a right off 395, he pulled over immediately, driving an old Chevy panel truck, dents, dings, rust, bondo, ski rack, clutter, more dents… and an engaging smile, “Where to?” he asked. I peered inside, noticing the x-country skis, Atomics and another pair too, Karhus I think, both sets obviously well used, newly waxed, freshly tuned too. Another loaded backpack beckoned there too, thrown in among the ubiquitous clutter, I grinned then quickly, no make that enthusiastically, threw my equipment into the back, sliding eagerly into an empty passenger seat. “Tuolumne I guess,” I replied, “but I am open… what’s going on?”

He continued talking, smiling broader now, rambling faster in choppy half sentences. “Road just opened… yesterday late…got freeze-dried food for a few days…how ‘bout you…nice pack… I am heading up far as Saddlebag… ever been there…wouldn’t mind company…you are more than…snow touring the area…real fine neighborhood…you got a good warm bag, how about a tent?” He drove and I looked down the canyon on the left, just nodding; he continued,” Have to ski in though…few maybe two - three miles…I see you got excellent x-country skis…tried those…edges…hmmmmm…you any good? Ever heard about ice fishing, great… the dam might be open…some friends there last year…slayed a mess of them…got any fishing gear?”

Just past TPR, the Tioga Pass Resort, two miles before the high Yosemite portal, we pulled over and parked – well off road, sliding noisily into the wet crunchy slush beneath a sign - an arrow pointing north: Saddlebag Lake 3 miles. I waxed up my Kazamas – it was either a red or purple klister day if I remember correctly - laced up my gaiters, threw on my pack, and followed his freshly laid ankle-deep tracks. X-country skiing on untracked but consolidated Sierra snow is part ecstasy, part work, mostly technique, part stupidity, and a lot of dedication - (all fun in my book – my kind of sport, cerebral, not totally unlike the sport of fishing). I was skiing on 210’s, mountaineering skis – metal edges, 3-pin bindings with heel locaters… sometimes slapping loudly on the snow, silently sliding at others, we both skied hard, panting – proceeding quietly, ever deeper into a white and deafening silence.

If you ever ski the Sierra, you know that the snow there is at best - variable: heavy, thick, mashed potatoes, muck, - often wet, soft, and deep in the sun, (the stuff that induces headplants), but icy-fast, razor-sharp, and rock-hard in the shade. The road up to Saddlebag is mostly uphill; well, it is up and down, the road itself actually unseen, hidden - still frozen 10 feet below. We made our way up the trail, or what we best figured was the trail, up into the tranquil stillness, heading upwards toward the dam. Rounding the last curve, relieved, tired, and elated, we finally saw it, Saddlebag Lake, narrow and long, mountains behind, huge, completely iced over, the dam itself on the left, the closest visible structure… wide, protruding about 15 feet above the snowline. See:
http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=37. ... -119.27167

At the base of the dam, just offshore on the right, an ancient faded green building sat decaying; the signage says Edison. Snow covered the first story completely but we could not help noticing a third story tower, jutting obliquely, high up against a dark blue azure sky; there a small trap door left open, slightly ajar, tracks below – the only conceivable entrance down into the snowline. A snow cat bearing the same faded Edison logo passed us by noisily, clattering along, following down the canyon. The driver gestured – waved and smiled – his breath visible; whatever his tasked mission, he was now heading jerkingly (and loudly I might add) back down again, leaving behind remembrances – a myriad of packed tracks and (after rounding the far curve) a return to welcome silence. We were alone; home in the quiet of the lake.

My newfound companion arrived at the dam a good 5 minutes ahead of me – perhaps a somewhat better conditioned skier, or maybe it had something to do with the fact that he had waxless skis - better on the uphill sections. Throwing his balaclava down and unpacking his backpack – a McHale (can you say ca-ching?) -I could see for the first time that he was bald, or rather he was a skinhead, obviously recently and carefully smooth-shaven, a small tribal tattoo also present near the base of his neck. He was about 6 feet tall, burley, 30-ish – maybe a bit older… now pleasantly imbibing on some expensive scotch – Oban, (smooth as a baby’s butt) - taking a well-deserved sojourn while warming himself under the dazzling afternoon sun. I skied over next to him, panting, dropped my Gregory, then joined him triumphantly on a dry exposed granite slab; I wondered aloud where best we should set up our tents – (hopefully out of the snow). I was eager also to test the subtle attributes of the single malt that he so fortuitously brought along with him - style. There was obviously no shortage of available camping sites; everywhere was flat, white, clean, frozen, and wide open.

No, I stand corrected, not everywhere was frozen. Inside of the broad wooden structure, the dam, down below, inside the weathered weir appeared an exposed gap of open water– maybe 15 feet across - surrounded by the omnipresent freeze – serendipitous, an ideal hole made for ice fishing. On further site inspection, on the far left end of the dam, the sun’s vivacity had uncovered some of the dam structure – grey, open gravel, flat, dry and even though a bit wind exposed, there was enough room to pitch two tents easily.
Atop the dam, skis abandoned, backpacks opened, tents erected, thermarests inflated, down bags fluffed, and at last, fishing gear assembled. Soon we sat on ensolite pads perched atop the pack ice, just below us, we danged lures into icy water. Dropping gold Panther Martins deep and slowly bringing them back up – jerking - faint tugs and patience produced fat but sluggish Goldens, the fight disappointing but the meat pink and sweet. Hungry, they would hit on anything, Kastmasters, Mepps, and Z-Rays, anything sparkling. I even tried a piece of foil wrapped around a small treble, and they even hit that. CAR was the order of the day, but we managed to save a few fat beauties for our dinner that night, frying them in olive oil with a bit of pasta – the typical Sierra backpacker’s fare.

The next morning, the sky broke crisp turquoise; I decided to explore more of the surrounding terrain – never seen before, skating across the frozen lake surface – long gliding strides making fast work on the icy flats. My partner, instead decided instead to stay put, fishing the dam again while I went off, his decision not bothering me at all, because it is always wise to have someone trustworthy watching over the exposed gear and warding off the small furry creatures. (Well, I did not worry about the gear…maybe the rodents though, as other than the CAT driver, we saw nary a soul while we were there – if someone came, they would be easy to spot them immediately against the white stillness.) I came back – early afternoon – only to discover my amigo was nowhere in evidence. His skis, backpack, and fishing gear were there still untouched, exactly as he left them, but he himself was not at all visible – he would turn up. At last, he called out; I looked up, only to discover him climbing out of the aforementioned third-story trapdoor, exiting high out of the Edison building, over a ways away next to the dam.
Calling me over, he said that he discovered the perfect place to crash tonight – warm – sheltered, and even with comfortable bunks to sleep on. We both climbed up the ladder and into the small third-story trap door, descending deep under the snow, dark but surprisingly warm inside due to the fire in the potbelly stove that he had going there, and, of course, the snow’s insulation qualities. We left our tents set up - outside, our skis remaining stuck upright, crossed in the snow next to the tents, but we carried our sleeping bags, food, and gear inside, making ourselves right at home on the rolled-up mattresses left bundled on the bunks inside. We were careful not to touch any food – there was ample though – we did not want to tempt fate or bring on any bad Karma upon us for any future Sierra endeavors; we even supplied all our own firewood.

We stayed there for three days more, fishing the heck out of that hole in the ice, catching numerous more Goldens – their flesh sweet and pink, their bodies plump, but the meat soft from lack of any arduous winter activity. We cooked the Goldens…steaming them… loosely wrapping them in aluminum foil, flavored with garlic, extra virgin, and lemon, until the eyes clouded over –all done over the black potbelly stove. We also spent a fair amount of time tearing up the bowls below Mt. Conness, practicing linking smooth turns, carving raw teles on untracked virgin snow… generally enjoying the spectacular corn conditions - spring skiing at Saddlebag Lake. Three days later we both skied out, he going left, returning down the hill, I opting right, continuing further into the meadows of Tuolumne.

I have returned to Saddlebag many time since, (it is located over 10,000 feet high in the Eastern Sierra spectacular), always taking notice of that small Edison cabin and the dam itself, remembering the spring skiing and the great ice fishing we had that one week. It all happened right after the road opened, this opening allowing us easy access to the ice fishing at Saddlebag Lake.

Another solo backpacking adventure…by markskor
Last edited by markskor on Wed May 16, 2007 5:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Mountainman who swims with trout
User avatar
markskor
Founding Member & Forums Administrator
Founding Member & Forums Administrator
 
Posts: 2048
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 5:41 pm
Location: Mammoth Lakes
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Postby giantbrookie » Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:12 pm

Buck Forester wrote:Good to see you here, giantbrookie®! I lived for a few years in Clovis (I'm now back up in the Sac area) and I miss being so close to the glorious High Sierra. I could zip up over Kaiser Pass in no time and be catching fat goldens the same day. Whether it's Yosemite or the John Muir Wilderness or SEKI, you're just a quick hop away. But yes, the smog, oh, the smog. It was a shame to not be able to see the outline of the Sierra just a few miles away on bad days, and just the faint outline on decent days. But when those clear days hit, it's amazing! But it's easier to put up with the smog knowing you can be in magestic beauty within a couple hours from your garage door!


Buck, since you lived in Clovis for awhile, perhaps you can tell me what is the "cutoff point" in time on 395 from Fresno/Clovis. In other words what is the point on 395 south of which it is faster to "go around the horn" (ie Hwy 58/14/395) rather than go 41/120 through Yosemite?

I have indeed started to exploit the proximity to the Sierra. Last summer my wife and I took two day hikes (one in Kaiser Wilderness, one in Jennie Lakes) where we dropped our son off at daycare, continued on to the trailhead, hiked to a lake, fished, hiked out, and drove back to Fresno in time to pick up our son. I do miss the Bay Area, but such a day trip wasn't even remotely feasible from there. We've also noticed that even the East Side is indeed closer: it took us only 3 hr 50 min to return from Mammoth on Labor Day weekend (at least 2 hours less than the time would have been to our old Hayward home). The only area that is farther away is the northern Sierra. Most Desolation kick off points are, on the average, an hour or so further away than they used to be.
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
User avatar
giantbrookie
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:22 am
Location: Fresno
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby copeg » Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:04 pm

Great stories everyone! Not to single anyone out, but Markskor, those stories are priceless! I enjoyed reading every one of them (and hopefully more in the future ;) )
User avatar
copeg
Founding Member & Forums Administrator
Founding Member & Forums Administrator
 
Posts: 1968
Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2005 9:25 pm
Location: Menlo Park, CA
Experience: Level 4 Explorer

User avatar

Postby HookUp » Tue Jan 10, 2006 12:20 pm

On summer, many many moons ago, a buddy and I had just made it to the summit and were resting.

Low and behold, the party behind us was also some buddies who we hung with constantly.

Interesting enough, we'ld never spoke to each other about the trip, had no idea each other were going, and never planned a thing. Just bumped into each other.

Another day, came around a bend to a few ladies bathing. Being gentleman we tryed to give them a wide berth, until the invited us to join them. It was nice to have someone wash my back for me. Chilly, but things warmed up nicely.
Freedom's not free
User avatar
HookUp
Topix Newbie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 11:54 am
Location: Virginia
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby Buck Forester » Tue Jan 10, 2006 3:11 pm

Hey giantbrookie, sorry I missed your question! As for a point along 395, well, if Tioga Pass was open and I was starting from Clovis, I always went over Tioga Pass. I much prefer the drive, although it's certainly twistier roads. When going to Lone Pine from Clovis I don't know if it's faster to go Tehachapi or over Tioga, but I always went Tioga regardless.

From where you're at, a quick way to get into spectacular golden trout country is to drive over Kaiser Pass and to Florence Lake, down to Jackass Meadow and continue to near the Diversion Dam. It's hard to find the trail but if you just work your way across the creek it should eventually come into view. It's not really much of a trail because few people go up there. In many trips up there I have yet to see another person in these basins. Chamberlain Lake is on one side of Mt. Hooper and Gordon, Harvey, and Hooper lakes are on the other. The place is gorgeous, not too far of a drive, and the hike isn't too bad although it gets fairly steep and tough to find at times. The views from the top of Mt. Hooper are incredible! There are other off-trail lakes to explore too. I love this area. You are also close to Thomas Edison Lake and the options there, as you know, are incredible too! And you're so close to Kings Canyon. You gotta take advantage of this stuff as much as you can, it's what makes Fresno/Clovis a great place for backpackers/fisherman! I'd trade easy access to Desolation Wilderness and Grouse Ridge for the High Sierra any day!

I don't know if this topozone link will work, but here's the Hooper Basin area I was talking about.
http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=11&n=4130442.00003608&e=330225.999985452&datum=nad83
User avatar
Buck Forester
Founding Member
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2005 1:38 pm
Location: Lincoln, CA (Sacramento area)
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby giantbrookie » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:26 pm

Buck Forester wrote:Hey giantbrookie, sorry I missed your question! As for a point along 395, well, if Tioga Pass was open and I was starting from Clovis, I always went over Tioga Pass. I much prefer the drive, although it's certainly twistier roads. When going to Lone Pine from Clovis I don't know if it's faster to go Tehachapi or over Tioga, but I always went Tioga regardless.

From where you're at, a quick way to get into spectacular golden trout country is to drive over Kaiser Pass and to Florence Lake, down to Jackass Meadow and continue to near the Diversion Dam. It's hard to find the trail but if you just work your way across the creek it should eventually come into view. It's not really much of a trail because few people go up there. In many trips up there I have yet to see another person in these basins. Chamberlain Lake is on one side of Mt. Hooper and Gordon, Harvey, and Hooper lakes are on the other. The place is gorgeous, not too far of a drive, and the hike isn't too bad although it gets fairly steep and tough to find at times. The views from the top of Mt. Hooper are incredible! There are other off-trail lakes to explore too. I love this area. You are also close to Thomas Edison Lake and the options there, as you know, are incredible too! And you're so close to Kings Canyon. You gotta take advantage of this stuff as much as you can, it's what makes Fresno/Clovis a great place for backpackers/fisherman! I'd trade easy access to Desolation Wilderness and Grouse Ridge for the High Sierra any day!

I don't know if this topozone link will work, but here's the Hooper Basin area I was talking about.
http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=11&n=4130442.00003608&e=330225.999985452&datum=nad83

Thanks for your reply. Regarding the 395 c/o, my back of the envelope calculations suggested that somewhere between Lone Pine and Independence was the cutoff. I like the scenery going over 120, but sometimes the exceptionally slow (and sometimes discourteous) drivers within the Park have me thinking of alternatives.

Regarding Chamberlain-Gordon et al., my wife and I fished those lakes in August 1990. We were actually a bit surprised (and disappointed) to find that there was a moderately-developed trail, with evidence of moderately heavy pack train use, going to the Gordon-Harvey-Hooper basin, given that no trail shows on the map (we were hoping for 100% off trail); there were several other groups in the basin as of our visit. Chamberlain, however, was another matter. That one is set off trailless from the main basin and for this reason very few people get there (nobody there when we visited). August in a dry year is a bad time to go for goldens, so fishing was a bit slow. Our fish topped out at 11" in Gordon-Harvey-Hooper (a friend of mine had reported them larger earlier in the year), and 13" at Chamberlain. I saw a very large golden in Chamberlain that probably exceeded 17". The biggest theatrics of the trip, however, was the auto ford of the San Joaquin below Florence. The car didn't stall, but I recall the exhaust pipe blowing bubbles in the water as we went across.

As for trading Quincy/I-80/Desolation for the real Sierra, I think the High Sierra is better overall (for hiking), but there are (were?--note my concerns about management changes) certainly more big fish backcountry lakes in the N. Sierra. Plus the N. Sierra has all these places that are perfect for beginner hikes and my oldest one is getting to the age when he can start taking advantage of that. Of course the effort can be part of the fun in the higher Sierra. Gilmore, Lower Velma, Heather are great for big fish stories, but because of the crowds, they don't have the magic of many of the High Sierra trailless spots my wife and I have been to (including the spot mentioned in earlier in the thread).
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
User avatar
giantbrookie
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:22 am
Location: Fresno
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby Buck Forester » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:52 pm

Wow, that's odd you found so many parties at Gordon/Harvey Lakes! I've been there many times over the years and have never seen another person. There is a large firepit camp on the lowest lake that I assumed the folks at the nearby horse outfitter near Florence used for personal use to get away, but I guessed maybe they went in just a couple times a year or so. The area has always seemed so pristine to me. I have caught some nice goldens in these lakes, but nothing huge. They were really bright ones too. Chamberlain is wonderful. I agree about the size of the trout in the north Sierra, although I have found some lunker trout in High Sierra lakes and of course the Emigrant Wilderness area has lots of lakes with huge trout. But overall, since there are fewer designated "wilderness areas" that seem to attract crowds in the north Sierra, it seems easier to find your own dream lakes that few know about. I have caught some monster trout in small lakes near Fordyce Lake that are off-trail. If they made that area a wilderness area then I'd hafta kiss that place goodbye.
User avatar
Buck Forester
Founding Member
 
Posts: 452
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2005 1:38 pm
Location: Lincoln, CA (Sacramento area)
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby giantbrookie » Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:43 pm

Buck Forester wrote:Wow, that's odd you found so many parties at Gordon/Harvey Lakes! I've been there many times over the years and have never seen another person. There is a large firepit camp on the lowest lake that I assumed the folks at the nearby horse outfitter near Florence used for personal use to get away, but I guessed maybe they went in just a couple times a year or so. The area has always seemed so pristine to me. I have caught some nice goldens in these lakes, but nothing huge. They were really bright ones too. Chamberlain is wonderful. I agree about the size of the trout in the north Sierra, although I have found some lunker trout in High Sierra lakes and of course the Emigrant Wilderness area has lots of lakes with huge trout. But overall, since there are fewer designated "wilderness areas" that seem to attract crowds in the north Sierra, it seems easier to find your own dream lakes that few know about. I have caught some monster trout in small lakes near Fordyce Lake that are off-trail. If they made that area a wilderness area then I'd hafta kiss that place goodbye.
Might those small lakes near Fordyce be the ones a bit south of it? We fished that area many times between 1993 and 1998 and it always delivered, but when the air drops ceased in 2000 things pretty much went south there, or so I'm told (haven't been there myself since '98). I had a number of emails from 2000-2004 from some very seasoned and successful N. Sierra fishing folks, all of whom didn't so much as encounter a sign of life there. Those lakes will be no more unless they get a fingerling care package every so often. Even if those lakes are fishless there are still some nifty little hideaways in the I-80 corridor however, including this one that is a bit more than a mile from where you park the car and has self-sustaining browns (not gigantic but they do appear to reach the 16" range or so). As you say, if many of these spots were designated as wilderness areas, they'd be overrun. As it is, the Grouse Ridge and Loch Leven areas see quite a few visitors. There are parts of Desolation and the region surrounding it that, believe it or not, don't see many hikers. The northwesternmost part in particular (see summary on the "fishing updates" page of my website"). We went an entire day without seeing a person last summer and had the grand total for the other three days was something like five different parties spread out over a pretty big area--that's comparable to the High Sierra.
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html
User avatar
giantbrookie
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
Founding Member & Forums Moderator
 
Posts: 2439
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:22 am
Location: Fresno
Experience: N/A

User avatar

Postby JM21760 » Tue Jan 10, 2006 10:10 pm

Markskor, your description of "Sierra Snow" is most eloquent. And correct.
User avatar
JM21760
Topix Regular
 
Posts: 185
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2005 3:57 pm
Location: Carson City, NV. Former Tahoe South Shore, 25 years.
Experience: N/A

PreviousNext

Return to Backpacking / Hiking / Camping



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Broot, Google Adsense [Bot], sekihiker and 9 guests