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Early Summer

If you've been searching for the best source of information and stimulating discussion related to Spring/Summer/Fall backpacking, hiking and camping in the Sierra Nevada...look no further!
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Postby nezshoo_03 » Fri Mar 17, 2006 4:02 pm

Anyone know any good sites that have good JMT information like trial maps and other things I should know?
<(O_o<) MeOw~~



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Postby copeg » Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:17 pm

nezshoo_03 wrote:Anyone know any good sites that have good JMT information like trial maps and other things I should know?


There are a lot of websites out there about the JMT. I don't think there is one single site that compiles them all, so google is your friend :) You can also buy the "Guide to the John Muir Trail" book on amazon which has good descriptions and maps. Here's a trip report with photos from my 2003 JMT trip.
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Postby yosemitechris » Sat Mar 18, 2006 11:33 am

My site http://www.jmt2k.com has trail maps, trail descriptions, equipment, daily logs and pictures. We have not finished the links and food pages, though. The "old site" link covers our 2000 trip south to north and the main site covers our 2002 trip north to south.
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Postby copeg » Sat Mar 18, 2006 1:03 pm

yosemitechris wrote:My site http://www.jmt2k.com has trail maps, trail descriptions, equipment, daily logs and pictures. We have not finished the links and food pages, though. The "old site" link covers our 2000 trip south to north and the main site covers our 2002 trip north to south.

Wow yosemitechris, I hadn't looked at your site in quite a while. It looks awesome! Well done!
Greg
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Postby yosemitechris » Sat Mar 18, 2006 1:10 pm

It's mostly my son's doing, but thanks.

I will be moving to NM in 3 days and will only get back to the Sierra once a year - but I will keep up with all things Sierra via High Sierra Topix. Thank s to all of you for your input to this site.

Chris
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Postby SSSdave » Sun Mar 19, 2006 9:29 am

A wise newbe would not take on a long adventure into the Sierra backcountry immediately without getting some shorter backpacks in first to smooth out the inevitable gear, body, and mental chinks. If one needs to ask they are probably far from ready to take a long involved trip of more than about ten days. You would do well by driving to the Eastern Sierra and spending some time about Mammoth and Bishop where there are lots of experienced mountain folk to rub shoulders with and information easy to come by for every kind of mountain backcountry place imaginable.

...David
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Base Camp

Postby gdurkee » Sat Apr 01, 2006 5:50 pm

I am a major fan of staying in one place and grooving. So I encourage you to do that -- hang out in one place and, ummm, practice....

That said, and reverting to my occasional role of "heavy" (which is to say, pointing out the occasional regulation on the care and feeding of these mountains -- which, I like to think, is only invoked when common sense isn't.) I'm a little nervous about the drum part and the apparent lack of experience. As much as you groove on them, most folks will not share your love for the drums in an otherwise quiet place -- no matter how quiet you say they are. It's not a natural noise (think: streams, birds, thunder, wind) and doesn't fit in.

Get a book on minimum impact camping. Find an out of the way copse of trees near a lake -- a real good chance you can't have a fire. Set up on pine needles or bare ground. Hang out. Listen to the lake. When you leave, make that spot look like you were never there. With luck, by the time you leave, you'll know what that's supposed to look like.

Oh and, alas, one more thing: both Sequoia Kings Park and Yosemite have maximum number of days you can spend in the park. It's rarely enforced in the backcountry, but if you're not paying close attention to being in tune with leaving no trace of yourself, it will be.

Have fun.

George
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Postby Buck Forester » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:20 am

I'm a little confused on what you're asking? You want to backpack in somewhere wild and remote, but carry your drum set? If you just want to "bang on your drums all day", I would suggest doing car camping rather than backpacking. But maybe I'm not understanding what you're saying. I used to take months off in the summer to roam and I usually did this in the northern Rockies, suck as WY and MT and ID. I love the Sierra and its my 'home range', but backpacking where there are still grizzlies and wolves and mountain goats and moose and wild elk is quite an experience. When I got back to the mighty High Sierra it felt sorta 'tame' compared to my summers in the wild Rockies.
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