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Llamas on the Trail

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Re: Llamas on the Trail

Postby homeranch » Tue Jun 15, 2010 4:39 pm

I have talked with many goat packers and they all swear that goats are better than llamas.

And llama packers will tell you that llamas are better than goats, some people prefer Chevys to Fords. Others Fords to Chevys. Personally, I don't like goats, never mind packing with them, I just don't like them.

As with ANY animal, you really have to be into animals - I personally do not think the chore of keeping an animal 365 days a year balances the advantage on the trail, even if you are out 60 days a year.

There really isn't much chore to keeping animals, llamas or horses or mules or goats. Takes me five minutes in the morning to feed the horses, llamas and now, Betty the mule, and the same in the evening, that is about it. I think if you have children, tending animals is a great way to build respect for animals, and to learn responsibility. My children are all grown now, and they all appreciate our animals, my daughter who just graduated high school and will move away for college told me I could not sell them, as they are part of the family, we negotiated.

That said, you do need a little land, an acre will do fine.



I would, however, love to hire a commercial packer who uses llamas (instead of horses) to bring in resupplies. Although it sounds good in theory, people who say they will still pack "minimalist" and use the extra capacity of the llamas for food only, usually end up throwing in extra comfort items. I have never seen a group with goats, llamas, horses or mules go "minimalist".

You haven't seen us, or me. We can go with the niceties, why not? for a 5 or 7 day trip, we precook fancy meals and freeze with dry ice, and we carry salad makings and frozen orange juice, and a table, a two burner cook stove and chairs for everyone. We can also go minimalist, imagine 20 lbs of gear and 240 pounds of food, you can stay out for months, if you wish.



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