Getting your feet wet

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Harlen
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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by Harlen » Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:48 pm

Great story WD. I have seen a lot river crossings- especially in New Zealand, where, like in your Wind River Range, there are a lot of serious rivers without bridges. Kiwi trampers taught me to just take off socks and use your big leather boots to cross. As you advise, they would pour out the liter of water on the far side, dry out the inside of the boot with the top of their socks, and off they'd go. In the 80's the ubiquitous tramping outfit was shorts and a "swani," which is thigh length woolen jacket. The shorts also made for easy crossings. Patience is a great virtue, and necessary tool in some ranges. E.g., we met a group of climbers in NZ who had been pinned for several hours between 2 rivers by a long downpour; they couldn't get back across the river they had just crossed.

In my most recent high water episode at Woodchuck Creek, I used the the time-tested technique of cussing and bush-whacking. Used it for 3 miles upstream, checking out and backing away from no less than 10 possibilities. I was alone with Bearzy, and would have tried a few log jams if not worried about losing or just freaking out Bear. I like backing off; a lost dog would ruin years of my life, let alone the trip. Trip report soon with a few shots of those scary cascades. Good luck out there.

100_1787 (2).jpg
Here's what I ran into upstream- it just got worse than the standard crossing.

100_1793 (2).jpg
3 miles up we found that half the branches of Woodchuck Creek could be crossed on snow bridges. Whew!
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robow8
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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by robow8 » Wed Jul 10, 2019 4:00 pm

kpeter wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:40 am
Anyone know if the bridge at the outlet of Ediza was replaced after it washed out a couple of years ago?
I don't think so, but I'll be there in a couple of weeks. I'll report back.

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Jimr
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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by Jimr » Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:12 pm

I crossed several streams last weekend half buck. On the way back, preparing to cross George Creek, there was a young lady with her dog preparing to cross. I was taking off my shoes and socks, then said to her, "pardon my French" and dropped my pants. She said, "no problem". Many of us in the mountains just don't dwell upon such things.
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tekisui0
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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by tekisui0 » Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:13 pm

kpeter wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:57 pm
Interesting! Do you wear neoprene socks inside your hiking boots? What kind? Do you have to wear a larger size of boots to fit neoprene socks in? Are they hot when hiking in dry weather?

I'm always interested in sock alternatives.....
Yeah, theyre just like socks and work wonderfully. I wear them inside the boots - never a blister and when everything dries out I switch back to my regular wool socks. I've worn them all day in and out of water with no problems. Not particulary hot, same size boot... I find the cheap chinese ones on amazon work just as well as the spendy ones, but perhaps arent as durable. The 3mm high top works best for me.

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tekisui0
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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by tekisui0 » Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:15 pm

c9h13no3 wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 8:22 pm
Count me in as interested as well. I've heard of people using these, but there's quite a few different kinds, and I suppose it's just like a wet suit for your feet?
Just like a wet suit for your feet - see above...

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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by giantbrookie » Wed Jul 17, 2019 3:28 pm

If a log or series of rocks is easy with good footing, I'll do it. Otherwise, I will wade and I will wade with boots on to protect my feet. After one of the wet ones I take off my boots, drain them. Wring out my socks, lounge a bit, then put the stuff back on and get on with the hike. Last Friday was a bit wetter than usual owing to getting swept downstream a smidge.
Since my fishing (etc.) website is still down, you can be distracted by geology stuff at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/csm/ees/facu ... ayshi.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Dwwd
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Re: Getting your feet wet

Post by Dwwd » Mon Jul 22, 2019 9:13 am

I navigate a stream crossings based on knowing my skills and limits. I have fallen, rock hopping or on logs, when I was watching the fish below me instead of where I was placing my feet. Falling hurts. So I recommend others make their own individual choices. Over time I tried both Tevas and Crocs for wading. I know the cold pains of ice water crossings in mountain lakes and streams. However, in swift water with poles, sometimes I had to make a "quick step" to catch my balance. That is when I had cut toes jammed in underwater stone crevasses, or an ankle gash from a large rock which was quite difficult to stop the bleeding. So I have ended up carring thick soled scuba boots(toe + ankle protection) for wading and a small clotting sponge in my first aid kit. The most surprising thing was in subsequent, ice water crossings, thigh deep, my legs and feet felt soo. . . much, much warmer. Just by wearing the booties when dodging ice bergs. See photo. I have no explanation, just an observation.
DSCF1178aCrossing.jpg
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