dogs

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Snowtrout
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Re: dogs

Post by Snowtrout » Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:17 pm

Making sure your dog is trained to voice commands, if off leash, is your number one priority as owner. My wife and I have 3 dachshunds that all have backpacked with us (two now retired) and our newest one is always on a leash. She is trained but her nose and instincts for being a little hunter could get her into trouble. Even if your dog loves people, some people might not love your dog. In 2015, my wife and I ran into a couple day hiking and had their sheep dog off leash. It circled me three times before nipping my leg on the calf. If i didn't have pants on, it would have drawn blood. I was pissed and they did nothing to stop it. Bad owner [-X

If you feel safe doing a water crossing, than a 40lb dog should not really have too much of a problem either, especially if it is a good swimmer. You could hook them up to a line (like someone else mentioned) if needed. Definitely take off their pack and attach or put in yours.

Our dogs love fish too and have often caught fish to cook just for them. Regular dog food along with dog treats or doggie power bars, go and end up in the canister at night with all the food. Side note: sometimes a dogs appetite can change while hiking--sometimes they won't want to eat the food they normally eat and/or sometimes they eat a lot less than at home. Just something to watch.

Compared to others on here, it sounds like our dogs sleep in luxury since they have their own down sleeping bag and pad. A fleece jacket might work for your dog but don't be too surprised on a chilly night, waking up to a cold wet nose digging for warmth in your bag. :nod:








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bobby49
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Re: dogs

Post by bobby49 » Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:24 pm

rlown wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:48 pm
If you plan to bring dog booties, you have to train them to be ok with them as well.
All of my lightweight dog fans get booties for their dogs, but the dogs kick them off. The heavyweight dog fans get some serious booties that seem to stay on. Any suggestions?

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bobby49
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Re: dogs

Post by bobby49 » Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:32 pm

rlown wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 3:15 pm
My dog will get fish as well, if we catch any. And cheese and treats...
Half of my dog owner friends say that any sort of dairy product is hard for a dog to digest. The other half say that the dog's favorite treat is a cheese cube. What is the truth? I'm supposed to pick up the dog in another week.

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Wandering Daisy
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Re: dogs

Post by Wandering Daisy » Thu Feb 21, 2019 10:21 pm

You will have an adjustment time with any new dog. I would not take them out backpacking until they settle in. The dog will let you know what it likes and what it does not. Our dog eats anything - digestion is fine if you feed them similar to what they get at home. Probably not healthy long term to feed dogs cheese, but it will not hurt for a short backpack trip. Our dog loves cheese sticks- just get the mild kind- no pepper jack! If they get bad poo at home from something, they will in the wilderness. If you feed the dog fish, cook it first. Do not feed the dog raw fish. Our dog eats out of our cook pot after we are done with dinner. She is a good pot cleaner! We leave her a small amount - same as she does at home- licks the dishes and get a bit of our meals. The people or shelter that now have your dog should be able to tell you what the dog likes.

Our dog is just fine without anything over her in Sierra summers. All she gets is a foam square pad with a fleece cover. In fact, she gets too hot on her sleeping pad and often moves off it to get her belly cool. What we have to watch is that she does NOT go in the water too close to bed time; cold dog, wet dog, smells!! Ugh!

And as for poo- our dog goes off the trail to do her duty. She is very fussy and wants grass. If her droppings can be seen from the trail, scoop them up and throw it in the bushes. If the dog poos near water, move it 200 feet away or burry it. If I were on a very well used popular trail, I would pick it up in a bag and then dispose of it well away from camp, water or the trail. What do you other dog owners do with poo in the wilderness?

A warning- long haired dogs will get tree pitch in their fur and it is a horrible mess to clean. Check your campsite to see if there are any pitch droppings around. Try to avoid camping in pitchy areas. Bring scissors to cut out clumps. I also bring a light weight brush and brush her every night. My husband does not care if his sleeping bag gets dirty and smells of dog; I do so I have a light sleeping bag cover for mine.

If you daily walk your dog 3-5 miles, they will develop tough paws. Our dog is now 6 years old and has much less trouble with paws. She had really tender puppy paws. But there is always the chance of cuts so booties still need to be taken. We still keep daily miles around 5-7 miles. Not a problem since we are usually doing a lot of fishing anyway.

Where is Harlen? It would be great to get his ideas and what works with Bear.

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AlmostThere
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Re: dogs

Post by AlmostThere » Thu Feb 21, 2019 10:30 pm

My dog will wear the booties for about an hour, then if we stop for any length of time she tries to take them off. But if we keep moving and keep her leashed she is fine for a while. I won't leave them on her for the entire hike, but when there is a lot of granite I'll put them on for a while. She doesn't tell us when it hurts and sometimes extended granite walking turns the pads red and hot. It takes some practice for them to get used to booties. Start them young.

She dragged me into the water when I tried to cross with her leashed - I was in a fordable spot and she went swimming downstream into a deep pool. The footing was too slippery for me to stay upright. I take the leash off to cross when it's a wade.

She'll get a little cooked trout, never raw. http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/vet/spd.htm
She's never off leash around lakes and streams, so she can't dig up or get fish guts out of the water - some fisherman attempting to toss guts in the deep part have lousy throwing arms. Often we see them in the shallows.

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rlown
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Re: dogs

Post by rlown » Thu Feb 21, 2019 10:41 pm

If you have to give a dog a pill that they don't like, right in the middle of a cheddar cube. It's just a cube of cheese; not a huge amount. I generally carry some milkbone treats in my pocket and he knows it so he stays close.

As for the booties, I got these:
P2210855.JPG
He does kick them off from time to time, but he and I are still learning. It is usually my fault for strap placement/tightening. Shoes are off during creek crossings. The feet work better given mine has webbed feet given the breed.

As for the tent accoutrements (pad and quilt:)
PA010843.JPG
Once asleep, he will stay on the pad and under the quilt, until potty time.
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bobby49
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Re: dogs

Post by bobby49 » Fri Feb 22, 2019 10:56 am

Snowtrout wrote:
Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:17 pm
Regular dog food along with dog treats or doggie power bars, go and end up in the canister at night with all the food.
What is a doggie power bar?

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Snowtrout
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Re: dogs

Post by Snowtrout » Fri Feb 22, 2019 11:37 am

Pitch can be very problematic for your dogs paws. We cut out as much hair as possible in between their paws on our longhair and trim back her claws before a trip. If pitch does build up, I will try to pull it out but if real bad, will rub peanut butter into their paw. The oil in the PB will break down the pitch and your dog will lick and chew out the sap while enjoying the PB on their paw. Olive oil also works

There is a product that can toughen their paws called Tough N Up (recommended by someone on this site) that does work, plus works as an antiseptic for cuts and worn spots while out on the trail. I don't always use it since if you walk and/or run your dog on pavement, their paws will become tougher over time.

We haven't gone the booty route since we haven't found any quality booties that work well for dogs under 15lbs. Plus being a small breed, if our dogs have an issue, they end up hitching a ride on our back. Not usually an option for bigger dogs.

As for poop, if done on or near the trail, a couple flicks with a hiking pole can disperse smaller droppings. Bigger dogs laying landmines might dictate a different approach though :-k

Doggie power bars--There are a few companies out there that make them (ex. Turbopup, Powerbark). Just like you, your dog needs extra energy. Always try them out at home before hitting the trail to make sure they like them and any other supplement food you might bring.

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bobby49
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Re: dogs

Post by bobby49 » Fri Feb 22, 2019 5:37 pm

I understand my own human condition, and I know when to drink water, when to drink Gatorade, or when to eat an energy snack. However, I don't yet understand that for a dog. It is easy enough to pour some water into a collapsible bowl for a dog. However, a dog can't tell me when it is hitting the wall energy-wise. I don't know what is healthy for a dog. I might need to carry a big bag of meaty dog treats.

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rlown
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Re: dogs

Post by rlown » Fri Feb 22, 2019 5:50 pm

You need more than 6 months then to learn the dog and for him/her to learn you. Have you ever owned a dog?
Note that they change habits about every 3 months and then there is a new learning.

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