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Weather in SEKI

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Weather in SEKI

Postby bryanalban » Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:56 am

Thanks for all the help on the previous post about backpacking in SEKI.

I've decided to hike to either Roaring River or Lost Lake, and was wondering what type of temps I can expect. I will be there the last week in June.

Roaring River is around 7600 feet, and Lost Lake is around 9100 feet.

Thanks for the help.



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Postby oldranger » Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:49 pm

In 7 seasons at RR Ranger Station the coldest temp I experienced in July was 25 the highest low temp was 62. Highest temp was about 94. All summer long I would get up and the temperature at 0530 was almost always 52, typical high in the low to mid 80s. Figure Lost lake about 5 or 6 degrees cooler. Be prepared for cold, even though it is unlikely. One memorial day weekend near lost lake it never got above freezing. To make matters worse as I repacked my gear I left out my long underwear and the only long pants I had were my gortex overpants. I spent a lot of time by other people's fire that week end!

enjoy

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Postby TwoFortyJeff » Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:37 pm

I think you'll have great weather. I imagine the mosquitos will be attrocious though. For all of July last year, the lowest temp I had in the area was 38. Of course this was in a tent at about 7am, so it was probably a few degrees cooler.

What trail head are you starting at? I wouldn't do Marvin Pass if you have a car. It has a few steep and rocky parts. It's rough in the mud from snowmelt too.
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Postby bryanalban » Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:25 pm

I'm planning to use the Sunset Meadow trailhead. It's then a 13 mile hike to Roaring River.

Are the mosquitos bad all day, or just at dusk?

Old Ranger, you're the perfect man to ask:

At Roaring River (or Lost Lake for that matter) what are the campsites like? Excuss the question if it's dumb, but I'm new to backcountry camping in National Parksin the USA. Is it one big spot for people to setup camp, or are the sites spread out? Are the sites marked?

We want to be somewhat "alone in the wilderness", so if we continue into Deadman Cyn. , were can we setup camp? Does it have to be in a designated area, or can we pick any area that is a low impact area to setup camp?

Thanks.
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Postby TwoFortyJeff » Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:51 pm

That's a good route. The first 2 miles are the hardest, but the views are nice. There is a lot of horse traffic though.

The sites are spread around the lakes. When you get near, there is usually a small laminated hand drawn map with rules and site locations. I don't recall if Lost Lake had a bear box or not, but those are usually on the map. I'd bet you get Lost to yourself. Some of the other nearby lakes get all of the traffic. If there are others there and they are quiet, you'll probably never see them.

Last year was a hellish mosquito year. I never figured out the pattern, but they came and went to different areas at different times. They are bad around dinner, but they stop as the sun goes down. There was one trail that you'll go by that was always a mosquito magnet. I had to stash my poles so I could use both hands to swat at them.

What route did you decide on?
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Postby oldranger » Tue Feb 20, 2007 10:43 pm

Last time I was in RR about 6 years ago there was still a bear box located between the Ranger Station and the bridge. Lots of campsites nearby. This area is the intersection of 4 trails but really doesn't get busy until the last week in July. Lost has lots of campsites too. My favorite was on the small hill just s. of the outlet. There used to be a bear box about 100 yards from the northeast corner of Lost Lake. It's been 10 years since I last walked by and I didn't camp there. Best to check with the SEKI backcountry office. It is kind of moot since you probably should be carrying bearproof containers. Rowell meadow, about 2 miles from the trailhead is incredibly popular with mosquitos. But it does have a great spring I used to use for drinking water and keeping my beer cold during the two summers I was stationed at Rowell.

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Postby ERIC » Tue Feb 20, 2007 11:55 pm

bryanalban wrote:Excuss the question if it's dumb, but I'm new to backcountry camping in National Parksin the USA.


Where do you hail from, bryan? What's your experience beyond US borders? Just curious, is all... :)
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Postby bryanalban » Wed Feb 21, 2007 12:18 am

ERIC wrote:
bryanalban wrote:Excuss the question if it's dumb, but I'm new to backcountry camping in National Parksin the USA.


Where do you hail from, bryan? What's your experience beyond US borders? Just curious, is all... :)


Canada. I've done a lot of canoe camping in Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba.
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Postby bryanalban » Wed Feb 21, 2007 12:23 am

TwoFortyJeff wrote:That's a good route. The first 2 miles are the hardest, but the views are nice. There is a lot of horse traffic though.

What route did you decide on?


I'm leaning towards Roaring River as a "base camp" for a few days, then hiking out. That way I can explore Deadman Canyon and Clod Canyon a bit.

How long of a hike is it from Roaring River to Avalance Pass?
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Postby oldranger » Wed Feb 21, 2007 9:51 pm

About 4.5 miles and 2,700 feet of vertical. The pass is broad, with dark Fox-tail pine forest--no views. my most vivid memories are meeting a well endowed topless female walking up from spinx creek and another year when on my first trip from RR to the pass the only visible tracks in the trail were by my horses and mule from my trip out to Cedar Grove at the end of my previous season.
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Postby bryanalban » Wed Feb 21, 2007 11:01 pm

So would it be a waste of time to hike up to Avalanche Pass? (unless we would be lucky enough to run into your topless hiking friend. LOL)

Are there any other peaks that we could day hike to from Roaring River?
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